Science

Jurassic relict reeled out of the ocean is a "totally unique" animal

Jurassic relict reeled out of ...
A close-up micro-CT scan of Ophiojura's eight sets of toothy jaws
A close-up micro-CT scan of Ophiojura's eight sets of toothy jaws
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Ophiojura is separated from its closest living relatives by 180 million years of evolution
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Ophiojura is separated from its closest living relatives by 180 million years of evolution
A close-up micro-CT scan of Ophiojura's eight sets of toothy jaws
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A close-up micro-CT scan of Ophiojura's eight sets of toothy jaws
A turn-around CT scan of Ophiojura
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A turn-around CT scan of Ophiojura
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While scientists hunt for signs of life on other planets, there are still plenty of utterly alien creatures left to find right here on Earth. Now a brand new horror has emerged from the depths of the ocean – meet Ophiojura, a “totally unique” type of animal with arms covered in hooks, and eight sets of toothy jaws.

The first, and so far only, specimen of Ophiojura was trawled up in 2011 about 200 km (124 miles) east of the island of New Caledonia in the southwest Pacific Ocean. There, French scientists were exploring an underwater mountain about 500 m (1,640 ft) below the surface, when they found the bizarre creature. And now it’s been scientifically described in a new study.

Ophiojura is separated from its closest living relatives by 180 million years of evolution
Ophiojura is separated from its closest living relatives by 180 million years of evolution

Ophiojura looks a bit like an elongated starfish, with eight arms measuring 10 cm (4 in) long that are covered in hooks and spines. They all meet in the middle in a terribly toothy grin comprising eight sets of jaws like some Lovecraftian nightmare.

The odd Ophiojura is not just a new species – it’s a new genus and a new family. Its closest living relatives are the brittle stars, which themselves are relatives of starfish, but “close” isn’t exactly the word we’d use. Genetic studies revealed that their last common ancestor lived about 180 million years ago, during the Jurassic period when dinosaurs were just reaching their prime.

Intriguingly, the researchers say they’ve also seen fossils from about that same period that look remarkably like the new species. The team says that this makes Ophiojura a “relict” species, which has persisted relatively untouched by evolution for millions of years. It may be the only, or at least one of very few, living species from a branch of life that was once widespread.

A turn-around CT scan of Ophiojura
A turn-around CT scan of Ophiojura

The team will embark on a new expedition in July and August to similar underwater mountains, largely unexplored, in the Indian Ocean, in hopes of finding similar relicts.

The research was published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Source: Museums Victoria via The Conversation

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8 comments
8 comments
Worzel
I'm glad that they are almost extinct! The thought of stepping on one whilst in the sea gives me the shivers!
Expanded Viewpoint
With all of those jaws set up to eat, how is its digestive system configured? Is there a stomach for each mouth? How does it reproduce?
Gods Holy Trousers
What if that was the last one?
DavidB
I learned a new word, today!

Thanks, New Atlas!
Kevin Ritchey
It took this long to report on its discovery? What else hasn’t been reported on?
Signguy
Yeah, dude, they were found 1,600 ft below the surface, soooooo....Worzel, not likely.
Jay Gatto
Worzel, Ophiojura might feel the same about immeasurably selfish humans.
rpark
...hmmm, looks like the precursor to a sand dollar ?