Urban Transport

Wheela scootbike: A minimalist Dandy Horse for the modern age

The Wheela scootbike combines aspects of a bicycle and scooter
The Wheela scootbike combines aspects of a bicycle and scooter
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The Wheela scootbike can be easily collapsed and carried
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The Wheela scootbike can be easily collapsed and carried
The Wheela scootbike combines aspects of a bicycle and scooter
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The Wheela scootbike combines aspects of a bicycle and scooter
The Wheela is highly maneuverable on flat, dry surfaces
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The Wheela is highly maneuverable on flat, dry surfaces
The Wheela scootbike features handlebars with grips for comfort
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The Wheela scootbike features handlebars with grips for comfort
The Wheela is light and can be easily carried once folded
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The Wheela is light and can be easily carried once folded
The Wheela collapses along the center bar then locks in place
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The Wheela collapses along the center bar then locks in place
The Wheela scootbike features an anatomical seat
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The Wheela scootbike features an anatomical seat
The polyurethane wheels on the Wheela scootbike
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The polyurethane wheels on the Wheela scootbike
The Wheela scootbike can fit into a small space once folded
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The Wheela scootbike can fit into a small space once folded

Harking back to the pre-bicycle days of the Dandy Horse, the Wheela scootbike places riders in a sitting position from which they propel themselves by kicking along the ground like a scooter. But unlike it's wooden-framed forebear, the Wheela uses modern materials, folds down for easy carrying, and offers the option of an electric motor.

The inventor of the Wheela is a professional sailor who came up with the idea after being frustrated by an inability to store a bike or something like it on board the limited confines of a boat. The result is a scooter that you sit on while you ride and can quickly be folded and easily carried on your shoulder or stored in a small space when you don't need it. The medium model folds from a size of 88 cm (34 in) high and 77 cm (30 in)wide, to a stick-like 92 cm (36 in) high and 20 cm (8 in) wide.

The biggest difference between Wheela and bike-inspired scooters like the SmartPed by FlyKy is that the Wheela actually requires the user to sit while it's in motion. There's no platform to put your feet, and the small pegs upfront aren't there to support your weight.

The Wheela is highly maneuverable on flat, dry surfaces
The Wheela is highly maneuverable on flat, dry surfaces

The company puts the Wheela at about 6 lb (2.7 kg), with the electric version adding a couple of more pounds due to the 250 W electric motor. Depending on size and speed, the electric Wheela is said to be able to go for up to 40 minutes between charges. Whether you use your feet or the electric motor, the company does point out that the Wheela is best used on flat, dry surfaces.

Wheela buyers also have the choice of ordering either a version made of aluminum alloy or carbon. All models come with handlebars with grips, an anatomic seat, a strap-belt, and a front-wheel integrated brake for safety.

There are four different sizes available depending on your height, starting with the junior version for kids who are from 51 to 59 in (130 to 150 cm) tall, to the large for adults 6 ft (180 cm) or more. Maximum weight load is 240 lbs (110 kg).

The Wheela scootbike is made in Europe and the company is taking pre-orders on the first 1,000 units now with delivery expected by July of this year. The standard edition in all sizes is US$289, the carbon version is $444, and the electric boost model is $599.

The video below shows the Wheela in action.

Source: Wheela

Wheela the Scootbike - introducing

5 comments
Prof2SI
Add an electric motor inside one of the wheels = the next perfect e-bike !
Tig
Looks like the STRiDA (circa 1987) but without pedals - see strida.com
unklmurray
I first thought "How Dumb" But then I remembered wanting a seat on a "Razor" kick scooter......On second thought...."Kinda KULE" too expensive though! I'll just wait a few weks and pick up one on Craigs' List for 1/3 the price!!LOL
Paul Anthony
$289! That has got to be a typo. $89 seems high.
Art Derfall
The website does have one with an electric motor for 40 minutes of riding. That would make it compact and practical. The video doesn't show much "shoe power", but I'm betting that's where it looks less efficient, especially on uphill grades. You have to give them credit for the most compact design possible that can hold significant weight for the application. The electric version, if the small wheels aren't dangerous, at $599 compares well with other electric scooters and the Boosted Skateboard.