Bicycles

Booze-totin' bike packs in the extras

Booze-totin' bike packs in the...
The custom bike on display in Salt Lake City
The custom bike on display in Salt Lake City
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The front rack can carry two bottles of wine
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The front rack can carry two bottles of wine
The bike is equipped with a full lighting system
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The bike is equipped with a full lighting system
A Schmidt front hub generator powers the lights
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A Schmidt front hub generator powers the lights
The mid-stay-mounted LEDs
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The mid-stay-mounted LEDs
The stem-mounted coffee cup holder
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The stem-mounted coffee cup holder
A 12-volt USB power port located in the rear rack can be used for charging devices such as smartphones while riding
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A 12-volt USB power port located in the rear rack can be used for charging devices such as smartphones while riding
Gear-shifting is handled electronically, via a Shimano Alfine Di2 rear hub transmission
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Gear-shifting is handled electronically, via a Shimano Alfine Di2 rear hub transmission
The bike comes with a color-matched Silca frame pump
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The bike comes with a color-matched Silca frame pump
The custom bike on display in Salt Lake City
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The custom bike on display in Salt Lake City
View gallery - 9 images

Have you ever tried riding a bike while carrying a bottle of wine or a six-pack of beer? Well, apparently it ain't easy. That's why in 2015, cyclist Rob Simon contacted Shamrock Cycles' Tim O'Donnell about building him a bicycle that could do the job. O'Donnell really went to town on the project, creating a bike with a bunch of interesting features. We checked it out last weekend, at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show.

First of all, yes, the bike is able to transport wine and beer. The front rack can carry two bottles of wine via circular cut-outs, while the rear one can carry a six-pack within a removable set of rails.

Additionally, a ring of bicycle chain mounted on the handlebar stem (seen at the top of the photo below) is able to hold a cup of coffee.

The front rack can carry two bottles of wine
The front rack can carry two bottles of wine

A Schmidt front hub generator powers a conventional headlight and tail light, along with two LED running lights that are built into the front ends of the mixte frame's mid-stays. That hub also delivers current to a 12-volt USB power port located in the rear rack, which can be used for charging devices such as smartphones while riding.

Beneath the rear rack is a spring-loaded holder for an Abus U-lock, which can be unlocked remotely using an app.

The mid-stay-mounted LEDs
The mid-stay-mounted LEDs

Gear-shifting is handled electronically, via a Shimano Alfine Di2 rear hub transmission. Also, instead of a chain, the bike has a Gates Carbon belt drive – an elevated chainstay makes that belt easier to access.

And should you be wondering, that snazzy custom paint job is known as "urban camo."

Company website: Shamrock Cycles

View gallery - 9 images
5 comments
5 comments
Dan Lewis
It's not the first of April yet! Lol. This is a joke, right? It had to have been 'invented' by someone who HATES wines. The bike has no front or rear suspension. The bottles would be in high danger on a standard road in the USA, either tossed out or broken where they are. Save this stuff for April Fool Day, please. Sheesh.
Douglas Bennett Rogers
A lot of bottles will fit the water bottle cage. If not, a modified cage could easily be made. If you are not a purest, the liquid could just be transferred to the water bottle.
artwisc
Shamrock Cycles! An ethnic stereotype just in time for St. Patrick's day. Great timing!
MerlinGuy
An excellent product for those who like their beer shaken not stirred.
Nik
'Reinventing the Wheel,' seems popular these days. As a kid, I delivered groceries and green groceries on a 'trade' bike, which could carry infinitely more than this machine, and a lot more safely. Most women's bicycles came fitted with front and or rear baskets for carrying their voluminous handbags, and shopping. Front wheel dynamo's were also very common. The only really attractive component is the transmission, which will eliminate the chore of cleaning and lubricating the chain, and eliminate the likelihood of 'cleaning' it with ones clothing. Electronic gear shifting may be good, but I'd question the reliability, and cost of repairs, if thats even possible, should it malfunction.