Bicycles

SitGo folding electric bike can be charged from a car

SitGo folding electric bike ca...
Other thoughtful features of the SitGo include LED headlights and taillights
Other thoughtful features of the SitGo include LED headlights and taillights
View 6 Images
When it comes time to recharge, users can plug the SitGo directly into a regular wall socket at their home or office, or if they're out and about from the 12 V cigarette lighter socket of their car
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When it comes time to recharge, users can plug the SitGo directly into a regular wall socket at their home or office, or if they're out and about from the 12 V cigarette lighter socket of their car
Arguably, the SitGo resembles more an electric scooter than bike, by way of a pair of fold-out pegs in place of conventional pedals and a chain
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Arguably, the SitGo resembles more an electric scooter than bike, by way of a pair of fold-out pegs in place of conventional pedals and a chain
Other thoughtful features of the SitGo include LED headlights and taillights
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Other thoughtful features of the SitGo include LED headlights and taillights
The vehicle is propelled entirely by a 180 W brushless hub motor and a 36 V lithium battery
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The vehicle is propelled entirely by a 180 W brushless hub motor and a 36 V lithium battery
The 102 cm tall (40 in), 98 cm (39 in) long frame can be squashed down into a 75 x 64 cm (30 x 25 in) package
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The 102 cm tall (40 in), 98 cm (39 in) long frame can be squashed down into a 75 x 64 cm (30 x 25 in) package
When it comes time to recharge, users can plug the SitGo directly into a regular wall socket at their home or office, or if they're out and about from the 12 V cigarette lighter socket of their car
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When it comes time to recharge, users can plug the SitGo directly into a regular wall socket at their home or office, or if they're out and about from the 12 V cigarette lighter socket of their car
View gallery - 6 images

The latest e-bike to enter the folding bike fold is the SitGo, which, like other models, can be packed down into a more compact package for storage or carrying on public transport or in a car. But in addition to regular household outlets, the SitGo can also be recharged through a car cigarette lighter socket.

At a glance, there's nothing particularly special about the 20-kg (44-lb) SitGo folding e-bike, other than perhaps appearing more peculiar than other folding bikes. Its 102-cm (40-in) tall, 98-cm (39-in) long frame can be squashed down into a 75 x 64 cm (30 x 25 in) package to be placed in car trunks or on crowded trains.

Arguably, it resembles more an electric scooter than bike, by way of a pair of fold-out pegs in place of conventional pedals and a chain. This means the vehicle is propelled entirely by a 180 W brushless hub motor and a 36 V lithium battery, with a claimed top speed of 25 km/h (15 mph) and range of 35 to 40 km (21.7 to 25 mi).

When it comes time to recharge, users can plug the SitGo directly into a regular wall socket at their home or office, or if they're out and about from the 12 V cigarette lighter socket of their car
When it comes time to recharge, users can plug the SitGo directly into a regular wall socket at their home or office, or if they're out and about from the 12 V cigarette lighter socket of their car

When it comes time to recharge, users can plug the SitGo directly into a regular wall socket at their home or office, or from the 12 V cigarette lighter socket of their car if they're out and about, with charging time rated at three to five hours. Other thoughtful features include a 360-degree rotating smartphone holder mounted on the handlebars, a USB port for charging mobile devices, and LED headlights and taillights.

SitGo is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where its creators are looking to raise funds for commercial production. Early pledges of AU$908 (around US$650) will have one headed your way in December if all goes to plan.

You can check out the pitch video below.

Source: SitGo

SITGO™-World's First Electric Bike Chargeable By Car

View gallery - 6 images
4 comments
steveraxx
Of the many machines seeking to be purchased, this one has a lot of positives. Thing is, Europeans are far more likely to adapt to this than Americans are. Given the relative inexpensive gasoline, Americans are once again purchasing overweight SUV's and trucks. Even when there is only one person who uses the vehicle and they have no need to haul things.
StWils
This seems like a pretty good solution but I think the geometry is wrong. It needs a larger rear wheel and a longer wheel base. The side picture shows the guy, and his centre of gravity, to be far too close to the tiny rear wheel. A somewhat longer length and a larger rear wheel would fix this drawback and still be very compact when folded. I would like to see the components be available in a kit form and at a modest kit pricetag.
Paul Anthony
This is a nice design and the price seems right. I do wonder if they missed a chance to have it be pedal assist though. Human power especially on flat surface can be highly effective and desirable.
PROBABLY they were not able to combine a hub that would be powered by pedaling and then allow coasting AND have the hub powered by an electric motor as well all while being compact enough. If someone can do that this would be the perfect little solution to getting around.
As for me, I'm going even bigger, I'm going with a trike. ☺
mariposaman
Unfortunately forgetting to add the ability to pedal and the pedals dooms this device unable to be legally used for the roads in most jurisdictions. This is not an ebike as it cannot be pedaled and cannot be used as a moped because it would not pass the requirements of a moped or motorbike...
A lot of these devices seem to be produced with poor knowledge of the laws governing them, generally trying to sell something that cannot be legally used generally with few exceptions.