Outdoors

SkiTaker lets you carry your skis using your feet

The SkiTaker system allows users to clip the bottoms of the skis onto the sides of their boots
The SkiTaker system allows users to clip the bottoms of the skis onto the sides of their boots
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The SkiTaker system allows users to clip the bottoms of the skis onto the sides of their boots
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The SkiTaker system allows users to clip the bottoms of the skis onto the sides of their boots
The user just walks while holding onto the tops of the skis, which scissor along on either side of them
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The user just walks while holding onto the tops of the skis, which scissor along on either side of them
The two SkiTaker receptacles are made mainly from polyamide and glass fiber, and quickly attach to each of the user's ski boots via included polyester straps
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The two SkiTaker receptacles are made mainly from polyamide and glass fiber, and quickly attach to each of the user's ski boots via included polyester straps
They weigh less than half a pound (227 g) each, and stay on the boots while the user is skiing
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They weigh less than half a pound (227 g) each, and stay on the boots while the user is skiing
A clip cradles the bottom of the ski, while an adjustable-width guide adds some lateral stability
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A clip cradles the bottom of the ski, while an adjustable-width guide adds some lateral stability

Downhill skis may give you an unmatched feeling of freedom and exhilaration when you're actually skiing, but they can be quite awkward to carry when you're not on the slopes. That's why a group of Spanish entrepreneurs has created the SkiTaker system. It allows users to clip the ends of their skis onto the sides of their boots, then "walk" their skis around vaguely like upside-down stilts.

The two SkiTaker receptacles are made mainly from polyamide and glass fiber, and quickly attach to each of the user's ski boots via included polyester straps. They weigh less than half a pound (227 g) each, and stay on the boots while the user is skiing.

When it's time to transport the skis, the user just lowers the tail end of each one into its respective receptacle – a clip cradles the bottom of the ski, while an adjustable-width guide adds some lateral stability. From there, the user just walks while holding onto the tops of the skis, which scissor along on either side of them.

The user just walks while holding onto the tops of the skis, which scissor along on either side of them
The user just walks while holding onto the tops of the skis, which scissor along on either side of them

It looks like the setup could get pretty awkward when doing things such as climbing stairs or boarding a gondola, although users could just pull the skis out and carry them in their arms in such situations.

The SkiTaker designers are currently raising large-scale production funds, on Indiegogo. A pledge of US$36 will get you a pair, with shipping set to begin next month – production has already begun, so backers reportedly should receive their SkiTaker sets even if the funding goal isn't met. The planned retail price is $59. You can see a demo of the system in the pitch video below.

For an example of another device intended to make transporting skis easier, check out the SkiCart. An unsuccessful Kickstarter product, it added small wheels to the tails of skis, so they could be pulled around like luggage.

Sources: SkiTaker, Indiegogo

SKITAKER INDIEGOGO live

3 comments
sk8dad
Let me understand this correctly... This convenient device, unlike traditional methods, requires both hands to carry a set of skis rendering mundane tasks such as using the handrail, adjusting one's goggles, unzipping jackets, and opening doors more challenging? At the end of the day, how does one hold a cup of coffee while walking back to the parking lot? Sounds like a winner to me
EUbrainwashing
Fancy having a giant hook on both of your feet when crashing into the woods or in safety netting? Not me - that's MAD! And with your poles you do what? Too often I have needed the poles together in one hand to steady myself when whilst carrying skis and walking on slippery stuff in ski-boots. If everybody only used these boot/hook things and then some bright spark showed us the technique of how to simply hup-up and carry skis with poles on your shoulder we would all just be doing that in a week. Better to invest in a set of 'QuickPoles' and you will wonder how you ever managed, apres-ski, to walk about town and stuff before. They allow you to clip the poles into your ski-bindings and then you can carry the lot in one hand, even ungloved if necessary.
Schreibtribe
Great way to slice your glove/hand open on the edge. This invention makes a lot of sense, having been invented in a country where nobody skis. Love the top notch voiceovers and downhill techniques in the promo!