Clothes

  • Science
    New research has found that each of us is regularly producing our own personal cloud of pollutants, affecting indoor air quality. But not the way you think. The team found that oils on our skin and clothes are reacting with ozone in the air, producing a range of volatile and semi-volatile substances
  • ​Aimed at off-grid tiny home dwellers, campers and city folk looking to reduce their environmental impact, and their utility bills, the Drumi originally went up for pre-order back in 2015. Now, the foot-powered mini washing machine is in production ahead of shipping in the coming months.​
  • Start Today has released ZozoSuit, which looks like hi-tech long underwear but could revolutionize buying cloths online. The suit contains over 150 integrated capacitive stretch sensors that capture 15,000 precise body measurements to ensure that clothes purchased over the internet are a good fit.
  • A team from the University of Washington has developed a system that lets passcodes be stored in your clothes without electronics, courtesy of a patch of magnetic fabric that can be read by sensors at a door or vending machine.
  • Most of us use a washing machine to do our laundry, instead of washing it by hand. Well, effie is an ironing machine. According to its UK-based creators, you just hang damp clothes up in it – straight from the washer – and they come out dried, pressed and wrinkle-free.
  • Every parent knows what it's like to buy new clothes for their child, only to find they've already outgrown them by the second wash. A new kind of outerwear called Petit Pli could reduce waste, hassle, and perhaps money by expanding in size as the child grows.
  • ​Vollebak makes outdoor sportswear with a science and tech slant. Some of the company's earlier innovations included the 100 Year Hoodie, made from super-strong aramid fibers, and a series of Relaxation Hoodies. The latest item to join the Vollebak wardrobe is a glow-in-the-dark, waterproof jacket.
  • Where most "smart clothes" generally function like wearable fitness trackers, researchers in Canada have focused instead on creating a smart T-shirt with the potential to help diagnose respiratory illnesses or monitor such conditions in real-time.
  • ​​When it comes to clothing, being both environmentally-conscious and fashionable can be tricky. Old clothes can be given away, of course, but they still ultimately end up in the landfill. That's why scientists have devised a method of essentially "melting down" old clothes to make new material.​
  • Sharkk has unveiled the Flippr, an ironing board that flips over so you can iron both sides of the garment without moving it. The tedious task is further sped up with accessories like pants clips, a wire shelf for the iron, and a detachable detail board for sleeves and collars.
  • Marilyn Monroe's star power is never more evident than when her memorabilia items cross the auction block. Will her "Happy Birthday Mr President" dress break records at auction on 17 November?
  • ​​Pretty much all of us have them – the forgotten clothes that we never wear. They really should be sent to charity, if only we could remember to do so. That's why a group at Birmingham City University has created what it calls the "Internet of Clothes."