Juno

  • NASA's Juno orbiter is approaching the halfway mark of its science mission. On December 21 at 8:49:48 am PST (11:49:48 am EST), the spacecraft will complete the 16th of 32 scheduled science orbits in a flyby that will bring it within 3,140 mi (5,053 km) of the planet's cloud tops.
  • Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system, has recently delivered a mind-bending torrent of amazing images, Over the past twelve months we have been treated to some of the best images yet including a magnificent shot of a cloud in the shape of a dolphin, swimming over the Jovian surface.
  • ​Scientists may have discovered large amounts of water hidden deep beneath the surface of Jupiter’s famous Great Red Spot. The discovery, which was made using ground-based telescopes, opens up the possibility that extremophile lifeforms could exist in the atmosphere of the enigmatic gas giant.
  • NASA's Juno orbiter found that Jupiter's colored bands extend thousands of kilometers below the surface, but why do they stop where they do? A new study has put forward an explanation, describing a complex magnetic field that essentially stops these globe-circling jet streams in their tracks.
  • For decades, scientists have been puzzled about the giant lightning storms in Jupiter's atmosphere, but new data from NASA's Juno orbiter indicates that Jovian lightning has more in common with the terrestrial variety than previously thought.
  • NASA's Juno orbiter mission to Jupiter has been thrown a lifeline after the approval of a 41-month extension. The unmanned spacecraft will have additional time to complete its primary science observations, with the extra time required due to the spacecraft taking longer than planned orbits.
  • Having completed 10 close passes as near as 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the cloud tops of Jupiter, NASA's Juno orbiter has found evidence that the famous cloud bands extend deep into the atmosphere, as well as clues to the nature of the planet's core.
  • ​The Great Red Spot, a storm bigger than Earth, has been raging on Jupiter for centuries. We’ve known its 2D size for a long time, but after a close flyover in July, Juno has finally revealed how deep into the atmosphere the storm’s roots run.
  • ​​NASA has released a playlist of haunting audio clips created from real data collected by famous spacecraft, such as the late great Cassini and Voyager 1, as they unravel the secrets of our fascinating and diverse solar system.​
  • A few days ago, the Juno probe completed the closest flyby of Jupiter's infamous Great Red Spot ever conducted by a spacecraft. After an agonizing wait the photos are now in… and they are absolutely incredible.
  • Juno chalked another one up for the history books as it completed the first close flyby of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. NASA today confirmed that the unmanned probe passed within 5,600 mi (9,000 km) of the giant storm at 7:06 pm PDT on June 10 during its sixth science orbit of the planet.
  • ​A massive storm bigger than the Earth has been raging for centuries on Jupiter, and now Juno is swooping in for a closer look. It will come within a few thousand miles of the Great Red Spot, probing the storm to hopefully reveal some of its mysteries, and snap some stunning photos in the process.