Sports

This robot is designed to clear the court

This robot is designed to clea...
Tennibot collects tennis balls, so you don't have to
Tennibot collects tennis balls, so you don't have to
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If users don't want Tennibot getting underfoot as they're practising, they can utilize an accompanying iOS/Android app to stipulate what part of the court it should stick to
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If users don't want Tennibot getting underfoot as they're practising, they can utilize an accompanying iOS/Android app to stipulate what part of the court it should stick to
When it's time to leave, the 25-lb (11-kg) Tennibot can be lifted at one end by its built-in handle, and wheeled like a suitcase
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When it's time to leave, the 25-lb (11-kg) Tennibot can be lifted at one end by its built-in handle, and wheeled like a suitcase
Tennibot collects tennis balls, so you don't have to
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Tennibot collects tennis balls, so you don't have to

In a typical tennis practise session, a lot of balls end up strewn about the court. Bending over and picking them all up is just part of the deal – but perhaps it doesn't have to be, if the ball-collecting Tennibot reaches production.

According to its Boston-based creators, Tennibot uses computer vision and artificial intelligence (along with a wide-angle camera) to autonomously roam the court, locating and sucking up tennis balls, then depositing them in its removable 80-ball-capacity rear bucket. Along with using its own onboard sensors to find its way around, it also wirelessly communicates with an included net-post-mounted "Tennibot station," which is a camera that continuously tracks the robot's location.

If users don't want Tennibot getting underfoot as they're practising, they can utilize an accompanying iOS/Android app to stipulate what part of the court it should stick to. That app can also be used to manually remotely-control the device, should users feel the need.

When it's time to leave, the 25-lb (11-kg) Tennibot can be lifted at one end by its built-in handle, and wheeled like a suitcase
When it's time to leave, the 25-lb (11-kg) Tennibot can be lifted at one end by its built-in handle, and wheeled like a suitcase

Tennibot travels at 1.4 mph (2.3 km/h), and can reportedly run for four to five hours on one 90-minute charge of its battery. When it's time to leave, the 25-lb (11-kg) robot can be lifted at one end by its built-in handle, and wheeled like a suitcase.

Should you be interested, Tennibot is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$650 will get you one, with delivery estimated for next January if everything works out. The planned retail price is $1,000.

Tennibot can be seen in action, in the video below.

Source: Kickstarter

Meet the Tennibot

3 comments
Trylon
I've never understood why tennis courts don't have slightly sloped surfaces. Only a half degree could make balls roll toward a gutter under the net, which itself could be sloped to one end to collect the balls in a reservoir, all without adversely affecting game play. A bonus would be that a sloped surface would keep rainwater from pooling on the court.
f8lee
This is great news! Finally my country club won't have to hire insufferably spoiled brats (children of other members) to deal with this nuisance! Yippee!
JamesDemello
You could also put a popup target on it too.