Automotive

New P100D Tesla Model S goes harder, lasts longer

New P100D Tesla Model S goes h...
The Tesla Model S P100D is the fastest accelerating car on the market
The Tesla Model S P100D is the fastest accelerating car on the market
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The Tesla Model S P100D is the fastest accelerating car on the market
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The Tesla Model S P100D is the fastest accelerating car on the market
The Model X is a bit heavier and slower than the Model S, but it can still scare seven passengers like no other SUV
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The Model X is a bit heavier and slower than the Model S, but it can still scare seven passengers like no other SUV
The Model X club got cheaper recently, now it's getting more expensive
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The Model X club got cheaper recently, now it's getting more expensive
The Model X will hit 100 km/h in 2.9 seconds
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The Model X will hit 100 km/h in 2.9 seconds
The Falcon Wing doors on the Model X add weight, but look fantastic
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The Falcon Wing doors on the Model X add weight, but look fantastic

Tesla has made a point of making electric cars exciting and sexy, rather than just focusing on the environmental benefits. So far it's worked – the Model S P90D has won fans with its range and luxurious interior, but most of the people who've driven it come away and just say wow, that thing is fast. Now it's even faster, thanks to the addition of the P100D model.

Forgetting about outright performance for a moment, the extra 10 kWh of battery capacity provides the Model S with a 21 mile (34 km) range boost. That means owners are able to cover 315 miles (613 km on the EU cycle) on a single charge which, according to Tesla, makes the Model S P100D the longest-range electric vehicle on the market today.

As well as being the longest range EV out there, the Model S P100D with Ludicrous Mode is billed as the third-fastest accelerating production car in the world, behind the LaFerrari and Porsche 918 Spyder. Sixty mph (98 km/h) flies by in just 2.5 seconds, all in a car with room for five and a massive boot.

It's not just the Model S benefitting from this bigger battery, it's also available on the Model X. Although capacity is the same, the heavier SUV can only manage 289 miles (542 km EU) on a single charge, and it takes 2.9 seconds to hit 60 mph. Although that's not quite as fast as the sedan, it's still enough to make the Model X the fastest accelerating SUV in the world.

The Model X is a bit heavier and slower than the Model S, but it can still scare seven passengers like no other SUV
The Model X is a bit heavier and slower than the Model S, but it can still scare seven passengers like no other SUV

Unfortunately, all this extra performance and range comes at a cost. People who already have a P90D Model S or Model X on order can pay US$10,000 to have their car upgraded, but owners who have already taken delivery are up for $20,000 to cover the cost of recycling the existing battery.

Tesla was also keen to point out that, while expensive, each range-topping car sold is funding the Model 3's development.

Source: Tesla

13 comments
VincentWolf
If only I could win the lottery!
GregSmith
Performance to 0-60 aside, what range could they possibly get if they went the more economical route ? While I love the kick ass acceleration, do we really need that in day to day driving ? How long would the battery last with a minimum electric motor and maximum gearing ?
Don Duncan
GregSmith: A burst of speed is needed to merge onto the freeway or change lanes or pass. Without it driving is less safe, and sometimes dangerous. But that can be had without sacrificing range. The extra energy use is momentary, so a capacitor would suffice. Also, with the Model 3 I was hoping for a cheaper, more efficient version, one which uses more light weighting, a two seater. The emphasis seems to be all on luxury, with no attempt to cater to the masses. Too bad.
Howell Haus
Impress me by achieving more miles per pound of extraction while focusing on the most important, end-of-life, recyclability aspects of this creation. When cradle-to-cradle implications are always the focus - then we are on the right path. The guy who wins in a rush to a red light is an idiot... just sayin'
ScotDouglas
How can the Model X be an SUV, when it doesn't appear to have any better ground clearance than the sedan, and from the specs on the Tesla page, there is no low range on the all-wheel drive? It doesn't look like it would do well on unimproved back roads, much less where there are no roads. I know that they are now calling some cross-overs SUVs, so I guess the term has become meaningless
MartinVoelker
Greg: The range depends on your driving style, just like in an internal combustion car. If you gun it and drive fast it goes down. In daily driving acceleration is nice to have, but all you need is mostly the 0-30 range (where my Volt excels).
Douglas E Knapp
GregSmith, I think you are missing the MODE thing. In normal mode you get the range and in Insane mode you do NOT get the range but you do get the 0-60.
Milton
@GregSmith: One of the biggest advantages of EV's is that high-performance machines can still sip electrons, while high-performance ICE's are not capable of sipping fuel. But yes, I would guess that the Tesla's range, and performance are total over-kill for 99% of the population. A Nissan Leaf, Chevy Spark EV, or BMW i3 is a more sensible EV solution for a lot of people. But for those with cash to blow (or a stupidly long commute), 0-60 in 2.5 seconds sounds like a BLAST! ... Perhaps the only thing better than owning a Tesla is having a friend that owns one.
eMacPaul
@GregSmith, I'm pretty sure the 315 mile range listed does not include doing maximum acceleration runs.
Les.B.
I'll take two, please.