Tiny Houses

The Tiny promotes small living to a big audience

The Tiny promotes small living...
The Tiny, by James Galletly (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The Tiny, by James Galletly (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
View 23 Images
The Tiny was made from an estimated 99 percent recycled materials (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The Tiny was made from an estimated 99 percent recycled materials (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The Tiny was designed and built within just 3 months (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The Tiny was designed and built within just 3 months (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The original plan was to build a fully-functioning house, but Galletly soon realized that the 1.8 x 2.4 m (6 x 8 ft) box trailer he was using as a base was just too small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The original plan was to build a fully-functioning house, but Galletly soon realized that the 1.8 x 2.4 m (6 x 8 ft) box trailer he was using as a base was just too small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Most of the materials used for The Tiny were sourced from The Bower and various Sydney-based salvage yards (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Most of the materials used for The Tiny were sourced from The Bower and various Sydney-based salvage yards (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The exterior cladding is a hodgepodge of salvaged metal, cedar weatherboards, and fence palings (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The exterior cladding is a hodgepodge of salvaged metal, cedar weatherboards, and fence palings (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The internal walls are lined with plywood sheeting and flooring sample boards (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The internal walls are lined with plywood sheeting and flooring sample boards (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Wall insulation used includes earthwool (a product made from recycled glass and sand), polyester fibers, and Pink Batts (an insulation brand) (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Wall insulation used includes earthwool (a product made from recycled glass and sand), polyester fibers, and Pink Batts (an insulation brand) (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Galletly aims to auction-off The Tiny, and the proceeds will be split between the Bower and funding his next venture (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Galletly aims to auction-off The Tiny, and the proceeds will be split between the Bower and funding his next venture (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The few new items which Galletly was required to purchase included a front door deadlock, an electricity inverter, and roofing screws (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The few new items which Galletly was required to purchase included a front door deadlock, an electricity inverter, and roofing screws (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The exterior cladding is a hodgepodge of salvaged metal, cedar weatherboards, and fence palings (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
10/23
The exterior cladding is a hodgepodge of salvaged metal, cedar weatherboards, and fence palings (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The Tiny was designed and built within just 3 months (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The Tiny was designed and built within just 3 months (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The ceiling is insulated with reflective foil-lined air-cells (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The ceiling is insulated with reflective foil-lined air-cells (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The designer hopes to inspire more people to live small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The designer hopes to inspire more people to live small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Where possible, everything was made from salvaged or recycled parts (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Where possible, everything was made from salvaged or recycled parts (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Inside The Tiny, there's a fold-up bed, storage crates which double-up as seating, and folding shelves and a folding desk (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Inside The Tiny, there's a fold-up bed, storage crates which double-up as seating, and folding shelves and a folding desk (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Most of the materials used for The Tiny were sourced from the The Bower and other Sydney-based salvage yards (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Most of the materials used for The Tiny were sourced from the The Bower and other Sydney-based salvage yards (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
There's no toilet or kitchen, but The Tiny does have a solar-powered electrical system (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
17/23
There's no toilet or kitchen, but The Tiny does have a solar-powered electrical system (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The Tiny, by James Galletly (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The Tiny, by James Galletly (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Interior shot of The Tiny (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Interior shot of The Tiny (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
Seating is simple and small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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Seating is simple and small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The Tiny sits on wheels so doesn't need planning permission (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The Tiny sits on wheels so doesn't need planning permission (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The Tiny was created to inspire and educate Sydney residents regarding the small living movement (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The Tiny was created to inspire and educate Sydney residents regarding the small living movement (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The Tiny sits on wheels so doesn't need planning permission (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
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The Tiny sits on wheels so doesn't need planning permission (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
View gallery - 23 images

Australian James Galletly, also known as "The Upcyclist," is on a mission. He wants to expose Sydney residents to the small living movement, and demonstrate that salvaged materials can prove useful long after they're discarded. In a bid to bring this about, he has built The Tiny: a pint-sized off-grid retreat made from an estimated 99 percent recycled materials that could serve as an extra bedroom or writer's studio.

The Tiny was designed and built within just 3 months in collaboration with Sydney-based co-operative reuse and repair center The Bower, and 20 other contributors. The original plan was to build a fully-functioning house, but Galletly soon realized that the 1.8 x 2.4 m (6 x 8 ft) box trailer he was using as a base was just too small, so he decided to scale-back somewhat and build a tiny bedroom/retreat.

"The idea is that the tiny bedroom could give a family the extra room they need without a costly extension/renovation, just wheel The Tiny down the driveway and set it up in the backyard," explains Galletly.

The original plan was to build a fully-functioning house, but Galletly soon realized that the 1.8 x 2.4 m (6 x 8 ft) box trailer he was using as a base was just too small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The original plan was to build a fully-functioning house, but Galletly soon realized that the 1.8 x 2.4 m (6 x 8 ft) box trailer he was using as a base was just too small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)

Most of the materials used for The Tiny were sourced from The Bower and various Sydney-based salvage yards. The exterior cladding is a hodgepodge of salvaged metal, cedar weatherboards, and fence palings, while the internal walls are lined with plywood sheeting and flooring sample boards.

The wall insulation features a mixture of earthwool (a product made from recycled glass and sand), polyester fibers, and Pink Batts (an insulation brand). The ceiling is insulated with reflective foil-lined air-cells.

The few new items which Galletly was required to purchase included a front door deadlock, an electricity inverter, and roofing screws – the latter were purchased new simply to speed-up the building process.

The designer hopes to inspire more people to live small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)
The designer hopes to inspire more people to live small (Photo: Alicia Fox Photography)

Inside The Tiny, there's some basic furniture including a fold-up bed and storage crates which double-up as seating. Folding shelves and a folding desk are also installed and constructed from Tasmanian oak cupboard doors.

The retreat doesn't have a toilet or kitchen, but The Tiny does feature a solar-powered electrical system, including LED lighting and an inverter and power point for recharging laptops.

Galletly aims to sell The Tiny at auction. The proceeds will be split between The Bower and his next venture, a comparatively larger and more fully-featured tiny home.

Source: The Upcyclist

View gallery - 23 images
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