Electronics

ThermalStrike luggage puts the heat on bed bugs

ThermalStrike luggage puts the...
If you're a bed bug, don't get into this suitcase
If you're a bed bug, don't get into this suitcase
View 3 Images
If you're a bed bug, don't get into this suitcase
1/3
If you're a bed bug, don't get into this suitcase
Infrared panels located behind the lining heat the contents of the luggage to 140ºF (60ºC) for up to eight hours
2/3
Infrared panels located behind the lining heat the contents of the luggage to 140ºF (60ºC) for up to eight hours
An indicator light lets users know when the heating process is complete
3/3
An indicator light lets users know when the heating process is complete

Although it's generally nice to bring things back from your travels, bed bugs would definitely not be among those things. That's why ThermalStrike luggage was created. It heats everything packed inside of it, to kill any unwanted stowaways.

From the outside, ThermalStrike Heated Luggage looks pretty normal – it has a polycarbonate blend shell, telescopic aluminum handle, reinforced corner guards, a Transport Security Administration-approved lock, and 360-degree rotational wheels.

Inside, however, infrared panels are located behind the lining. When activated by the user, these heat the contents of the luggage to 140ºF (60ºC) for up to eight hours. This is reportedly sufficient to kill any bed bugs in there, at any stage in their life cycle – including eggs.

Power is provided via the separate timer unit, the cable of which plugs into a wall socket at one end, and the suitcase at the other. Although a full eight hours is recommended for a full load of belongings, the timer can also be set to two or four hours, for sterilizing an empty case or smaller loads.

An indicator light lets users know when the heating process is complete
An indicator light lets users know when the heating process is complete

Needless to say, you'd want to remove any meltable or otherwise heat-damageable items before firing it up.

The ThermalStrike lineup includes a 20-inch carry-on case and a larger 24-inch suitcase. They're priced at US$199 and $249 respectively, or $399 for a set of both. More information in available in the video below.

Source: ThermalStrike via Los Angeles Times

ThermalStrike Bedbug-Proof Luggage Overview

4 comments
Purple-Stater
Killing off the primary, if not the only, way that bedbugs travel between hotels, would be a very nice thing.
StWils
I do not wish to be critical but eight hours is a long time to bake your luggage and a long time to interrupt your travel day in any fashion. Also, while the basic approach seems great how long until the wheels spin off this and a bag heats up inside an airplane cargo space? Also, what are the security implications? Homeland is not likely to be thrilled with luggage having enough battery power to run heaters for even a short time. Still, nice try! How about an appliance-like device to cook the goods on return to home instead of along the way?
VirtualGathis
@StWils - Eight hours is a long time, unless you are asleep so it really is a question how how safe you want to be, but that was kind of a given with the $300 price tag. As for the rest of your concerns I think you missed this line "Power is provided via the separate timer unit, the cable of which plugs into a wall socket at one end..." It has no batteries, so like a typical hair dryer only works when connected to mains power, so accidental activation in a cargo hold is impossible, and there are no batteries to offend the baggage checkers.
BigGoofyGuy
A device that warms up cloths to kill bed bugs when one gets home? Perhaps something like a cloths washer and dryer? I could see it being good but I guess there are also drawbacks.