Tiny Houses

Compact tiny house fits in home office area and room for guests too

Compact tiny house fits in hom...
The Hauméa tiny house measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long and gets power from a standard RV-style hookup
The Hauméa tiny house measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long and gets power from a standard RV-style hookup
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The Hauméa tiny house's two bedrooms are squeezed into one loft space
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The Hauméa tiny house's two bedrooms are squeezed into one loft space
The Hauméa tiny house includes a home office area
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The Hauméa tiny house includes a home office area
The Hauméa tiny house's kitchen is relatively spacious, compared to previous Baluchon models
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The Hauméa tiny house's kitchen is relatively spacious, compared to previous Baluchon models
The Hauméa tiny house's bathroom includes a shower and toilet
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The Hauméa tiny house's bathroom includes a shower and toilet
The Hauméa tiny house measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long
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The Hauméa tiny house measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long
The Hauméa tiny house's bathroom includes a shower and toilet, as well as a small electronic cat flap, pictured
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The Hauméa tiny house's bathroom includes a shower and toilet, as well as a small electronic cat flap, pictured
The Hauméa tiny house's interior walls are finished in spruce
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The Hauméa tiny house's interior walls are finished in spruce
Another shot of the Hauméa tiny house
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Another photo of the Hauméa tiny house's toilet
The Hauméa tiny house measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long and gets power from a standard RV-style hookup
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The Hauméa tiny house measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long and gets power from a standard RV-style hookup
A wooden ladder leads up to the Hauméa tiny house's bedroom
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A wooden ladder leads up to the Hauméa tiny house's bedroom
The Hauméa tiny house features a large window in the living area
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The Hauméa tiny house features a large window in the living area
The Hauméa tiny house squeezes two beds into one loft space
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The Hauméa tiny house squeezes two beds into one loft space
Natural light from the big window floods the living area
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Natural light from the big window floods the living area
The Hauméa tiny house includes a sofa bed on the ground floor and both a double bed and a single bed upstairs
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The Hauméa tiny house includes a sofa bed on the ground floor and both a double bed and a single bed upstairs
The Hauméa tiny house is installed near Nantes, France, and gets power from a standard RV-style hookup
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The Hauméa tiny house is installed near Nantes, France, and gets power from a standard RV-style hookup

French tiny house firm Baluchon recently completed a new model called the Hauméa. Despite measuring just 6 m (19.6 ft) in length, the compact dwelling fits in a snug home office area and sleeping space for guests.

The Hauméa is based on a double axle trailer and features a red cedar and aluminum exterior. It consists of a spruce frame and its insulation is cotton, linen and hemp for the floor and the walls, with wood fiber in the ceiling. It gets power from a standard RV-style hookup.

The Hauméa tiny house includes a home office area
The Hauméa tiny house includes a home office area

Visitors enter the home into the living room, which features a sofa bed and a small home office area that really just consists of a desk and chair, as well as some shelving. Nearby is the kitchen. This includes a two-burner stove, an oven, a sink, and quite a bit of cabinetry – though the owners chose not to have a fridge installed.

The bathroom is at the opposite end of the home from the entrance and has a shower and toilet, as well as a small electronic cat flap for the owners' feline companion.

The Hauméa tiny house includes a sofa bed on the ground floor and both a double bed and a single bed upstairs
The Hauméa tiny house includes a sofa bed on the ground floor and both a double bed and a single bed upstairs

A wooden ladder provides access to the Hauméa's loft space and this contains not one sleeping area as you'd expect, but two. The first, closest to the ladder, has a double bed and is a typical tiny house style bedroom. Behind this, and separated by a small wooden dividing wall, is a cramped area that seems best suited for storage but contains a single bed.

The Hauméa is located near Nantes and serves as its two owners' primary home.

Source: Baluchon

5 comments
Steve gotniven
So confused about this tiny house industry. Most stories imply that one may plop down anywhere he/she pleases, but that's utter baloney. You cant park a tiny trailer in your folks' driveway and stay there as long as you please. No municipality allows it, as far as i know. Nor can you you park it in some hidden grove, living off the grid, on govt owned land. One may park in a legitimate rv park, if you are willing to pay rent. And you cant remain there indefinitely initely either. The only way to stay put forever is to buy a lot zoned for such purposes. I betchya there are none in the good ol' USofA.
bzguy
This is so transparently fueled by the 1% in a blatant attempt to acquire all of the real estate and subjugate the working class even further in a time of run-away disparity. They never learn, the rich get richer until they get hung.
Ben Lucarelli
After reading the two comments I was moved to respond: I live in Vermont where towns are having problems with dwindling school populations. A friend built a tiny house with his daughter so she could have a place of her own without a huge mortgage. They began looking for a place to put the house about six months ago. The settled on a place in Ferrisburgh and went to the town clerk's office to see about regulations regarding placement of the house. The clerk responded that they are all for tiny houses and that the lot owner would need a permit to run the power and water. That's it. Now it might be different in other places, but here in rural Vermont, it's easy. The towns are motivated to accommodate alternate building tech just to keep the schools running. Also, this friend is not a 1 percenter, he's a carpenter and his daughter is a social worker who bought material as cash flow allowed. The build took about two years and she lived at home during that time.
Spacemiser
French windows generally open inwards (ease of cleaning, use of external shutters) but, it seems to me, are too intrusive where internal space is limited - as in this case - and especially over a hob.
Sambo
It'd be helpful to know the cost.