Tiny Houses

Off-grid tiny house opens up to embrace the great outdoors

Off-grid tiny house opens up t...
The Adraga's living room opens up to the outside with large double doors
The Adraga's living room opens up to the outside with large double doors
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The Adraga measures a total length of 7 m (roughly 23 ft)
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The Adraga measures a total length of 7 m (roughly 23 ft)
The Adraga is based on a double-axle trailer and is finished in timber
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The Adraga is based on a double-axle trailer and is finished in timber
The Adraga's living room opens up to the outside with large double doors
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The Adraga's living room opens up to the outside with large double doors
The Adraga gets all power from a roof-based solar panel array
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The Adraga gets all power from a roof-based solar panel array
The Adraga's bathroom includes a sink, shower, and a composting toilet
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The Adraga's bathroom includes a sink, shower, and a composting toilet
The Adraga's living room includes a sofa bed and a folding dining table
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The Adraga's living room includes a sofa bed and a folding dining table
The Adraga's bedroom is a typical tiny house-style loft with a low ceiling
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The Adraga's bedroom is a typical tiny house-style loft with a low ceiling
The Adraga's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood
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The Adraga's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood
The Adraga's living room includes a sofa bed
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The Adraga's living room includes a sofa bed
The Adraga's bedroom is reached by a storage-integrated staircase
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The Adraga's bedroom is reached by a storage-integrated staircase
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Portuguese woodworking studio Madeiguincho has followed its Ursa tiny house with another attractive timber model named the Adraga. The towable home runs off-the-grid and provides a comfortable interior layout that opens up to the outside with double doors.

The Adraga is based on a double-axle trailer and measures a total length of 7 m (roughly 23 ft). It gets all power from a solar panel and battery setup, while a rainwater collection system is connected to filters and provides water for shower and kitchen use.

The exterior of the home is finished in wood and this continues inside too. Much of the available floorspace is taken up by the living room, which contains a sofa bed, as well as a folding dining table. This space doesn't have too many windows installed, but the large glazed operable doors mitigate this and can be used to really open up the home to the outside when the weather suits.

Next to the living room is the kitchen. This contains custom cabinetry, a stone sink, a propane-powered stove, and a fridge. The bathroom is at the opposite end of the home to the living room and has a shower, sink, and composting toilet. The main door to access the house is also nearby.

The Adraga's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood
The Adraga's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood

There's just one bedroom in the Adraga, which is accessed by a storage-integrated staircase. The bedroom is a typical tiny house-style loft with a low ceiling and features a double bed.

The tiny house was commissioned by a retired couple who want to live off-the-grid and embrace nature, and it serves as their main residence in a choice rural spot in Portugal. We've no word on the price of this one.

Source: Madeiguincho

View gallery - 10 images
3 comments
3 comments
Michael son of Lester
I really wanted to like this. All that wonderful wood finish looks amazing. But this unit has the same issues I see in other tiny houses. (a) Sleeping in a loft a few feet from the ceiling would be a nightmare in the summer. Heat rises and a person would bake up there. (b) With the bottom on a trailer platform exposed to wind and snow, in the winter the floors would be cold. This may not be an issue in Portugal, but it was -34 last night where I live.
Wombat56
At first glance at the front it reminded me of a back yard chicken shed.

As Michael said it's designed for a particular climate. My pet peeve as with many of these tiny houses is stairs without a safety railing. It may take a few years but eventually someone will suffer injury or worse. You'll notice that if a person topples over sideways it's just about the right spacing to smash their skulls on the edge of the kitchen bench top.
Q
would like to see bathroom layout. I like the basic idea and love the finish of all that wood!