Tiny Houses

Luxury tiny house offers home comforts inside and a deck up top

Luxury tiny house offers home ...
The Magnolia V8 is topped by a rooftop deck area that looks pretty small but offers a place to sit and watch the sunset
The Magnolia V8 is topped by a rooftop deck area that looks pretty small but offers a place to sit and watch the sunset
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The Magnolia V8 has a width of 10.5 ft (3.2 m), meaning it's too wide to tow on the road without a permit, but it does make for a more spacious interior
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The Magnolia V8 has a width of 10.5 ft (3.2 m), meaning it's too wide to tow on the road without a permit, but it does make for a more spacious interior
The Magnolia V8's bathroom offers a bathtub and shower, which is still relatively rare in a tiny house
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The Magnolia V8's bathroom offers a bathtub and shower, which is still relatively rare in a tiny house
The Magnolia V8's bathroom includes a flushing toilet and a vanity sink, as well as some storage space. A stacked washing machine and dryer are nearby
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The Magnolia V8's bathroom includes a flushing toilet and a vanity sink, as well as some storage space. A stacked washing machine and dryer are nearby
The Magnolia V8 has a ceiling fan that helps keep the interior a comfortable temperature
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The Magnolia V8 has a ceiling fan that helps keep the interior a comfortable temperature
The Magnolia V8's kitchen includes a quartz countertop and quite a lot of cabinetry
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The Magnolia V8's kitchen includes a quartz countertop and quite a lot of cabinetry
The Magnolia V8's kitchen includes a dishwasher, farmhouse-style sink, microwave oven, and a fridge/freezer
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The Magnolia V8's kitchen includes a dishwasher, farmhouse-style sink, microwave oven, and a fridge/freezer
The Magnolia V8's storage-integrated staircase includes a pantry and drawers
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The Magnolia V8's storage-integrated staircase includes a pantry and drawers
The Magnolia V8's secondary loft bedroom provides access to the rooftop deck area
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The Magnolia V8's secondary loft bedroom provides access to the rooftop deck area
The Magnolia V8's master bedroom has a double bed that can be raised to reveal more storage space
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The Magnolia V8's master bedroom has a double bed that can be raised to reveal more storage space
The Magnolia V8's master bedroom includes a lot of storage space
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The Magnolia V8's master bedroom includes a lot of storage space
The Magnolia V8 is topped by a rooftop deck area that looks pretty small but offers a place to sit and watch the sunset
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The Magnolia V8 is topped by a rooftop deck area that looks pretty small but offers a place to sit and watch the sunset
View gallery - 11 images

Minimaliste's latest tiny house sees the firm riff on its popular Magnolia model yet again with the Magnolia V8. It offers similar exterior styling to previous iterations of the home but is topped by a rooftop deck area. Additionally, its interior boasts some enviable home comforts, such as underfloor heating, a bathtub, and a dishwasher – all of which are quite rare for a tiny house.

The Magnolia V8 is based on a triple-axle trailer and is on the large side even for a North American tiny house, with a total length of 38.5 ft (11.7 m) and a width of 10.5 ft (3.2 m), meaning it's too wide to tow on the road without a permit. Its exterior is finished in cedar, which has been treated with the Japanese Shou Sugi Ban method of charring the wood to protect and preserve it, and the roof is steel.

Visitors enter into the living room, which is arranged to maximize natural light. As well as the main door, it has sliding glass doors that will open onto a deck area. It also has a high ceiling with decorative pine beams. Impressively, almost all the glazing in the home is equipped with motorized blinds, which are operated by remote, offering easy control of the amount of light inside. The living room also contains an entertainment center and a folding dining table/work desk.

Next to the living area is the kitchen, which has a quartz countertop, farmhouse-style sink, dishwasher, a microwave oven and a removable single-burner portable cooktop. Additionally, it contains a fridge/freezer and some storage space, including a pantry.

The Magnolia V8 has a width of 10.5 ft (3.2 m), meaning it's too wide to tow on the road without a permit, but it does make for a more spacious interior
The Magnolia V8 has a width of 10.5 ft (3.2 m), meaning it's too wide to tow on the road without a permit, but it does make for a more spacious interior

There's a maintenance room nearby with access to the power supply, water filter, and water heater, and there's a washing machine and drier next to that. The bathroom is adjacent and boasts a bathtub with shower, flushing toilet, and vanity sink, plus some storage space.

The Magnolia V8's master bedroom is also on the lower floor, meaning it offers plenty of headroom to stand upright. There are also lots of built-in storage cabinets and a double bed that can be raised to reveal even more storage. The tiny house has one upper-level bedroom which is reached by storage-integrated staircase. This has a low ceiling, and a skylight that provides access to the rooftop deck. That deck looks on the small side, but will at least provide a space to sit and watch the sunset.

The Magnolia V8 gets power from a standard RV-style hookup, though can also run from a generator. It was built using structurally insulated panels and has a high level of insulation and airtightness, so it will need relatively little energy to maintain a comfortable temperature. A mini-split air-conditioning unit is installed, as is a ceiling fan, while the underfloor heating will keep toes toasty in winter.

The Magnolia V8 has a ceiling fan that helps keep the interior a comfortable temperature
The Magnolia V8 has a ceiling fan that helps keep the interior a comfortable temperature

We've no word on the price of the exact home shown, though the Magnolia series starts at CAD 130,000 (around US$107,000).

Source: Minimaliste

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1 comment
1 comment
ljaques
Starts at $107k, comfortable at $230k, right? Does anyone but me like indirect lighting? I keep seeing these tiny houses (and almost all big houses) with direct downlights everywhere. I have 2 wall sconces and 2 strips of track lighting which bounce off walls to provide ambient light without any glare. Why isn't anyone else using this?