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TrackR atlas gives room-specific locations when looking for lost items

TrackR atlas gives room-specif...
The TrackR atlas mobile app is powered by Amazon's Alexa and responds to voice commands
The TrackR atlas mobile app is powered by Amazon's Alexa and responds to voice commands
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The TrackR atlas is compatible with a variety of Bluetooth trackers
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The TrackR atlas is compatible with a variety of Bluetooth trackers
The TrackR atlas plugs into standard wall sockets and monitors the location of tagged items through a combination of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
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The TrackR atlas plugs into standard wall sockets and monitors the location of tagged items through a combination of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
The TrackR atlas mobile app is powered by Amazon's Alexa and responds to voice commands
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The TrackR atlas mobile app is powered by Amazon's Alexa and responds to voice commands
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Whether due to over-burdened schedules or just plain forgetfulness, accidentally-misplaced items can create inconveniences. Bluetooth tracking devices help keep tabs on personal items, but the latest from TrackR does one better than a game of "hot and cold." The TrackR atlas is designed to monitor belongings, pinpointing the room they're located in once each needs to be found.

Sure, a missing remote for the cable/TV may not be too big a deal, but losing your keys right before leaving the house for an important job interview can be life-changing. Each TrackR atlas device plugs into a standard wall outlet (currently supporting US, UK, AU, and EU sockets) and connects to the home/office wireless network. Along with its built-in Bluetooth 4.0, the units are able to actively monitor tracking tags that move in and out of range, sending the secure reports to the mobile app.

The TrackR atlas plugs into standard wall sockets and monitors the location of tagged items through a combination of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
The TrackR atlas plugs into standard wall sockets and monitors the location of tagged items through a combination of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth

Through the TrackR app, users are able to name each TrackR atlas. So when you're wondering what you did with your keys or where the pet is hiding, simply ask and the Amazon Alexa-powered app responds with the location. The app, available for iOS and Android, is designed to send push notifications when important items enter/leave rooms and maintain logs of where things have been. And since the TrackR atlas is connected to a Wi-Fi network, users can locate trackers and/or activate remote ringing from anywhere.

Even though TrackR has its own tracking devices, the TrackR bravo and TrackR button, the atlas is designed to be compatible with all major Bluetooth trackers. So whether you own and use Tile, PebbleBee, StickNFind, XY Find-It, or others, the TrackR atlas plays nice so everything functions equally well. TrackR atlas is also backed by a crowd GPS network, allowing users to seek help in finding missing items outside of the home, such as lost luggage or personal belongings during travel.

The TrackR atlas is currently funding on Indiegogo, having raised 66 percent of its US$50,000 goal in less than a day, with another 30 days left to go. A basic pledge of $39 sets you up with one atlas device, while higher-tiered options offer additional atlas and/or free TrackR bravo units.

Antenna tuning, beta testing, and certification have to pass before production can begin. But if all goes according to schedule, backers can expect shipments of the TrackR atlas to start sometime June, 2016.

Sources: TrackR, Indiegogo

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4 comments
Scion
Do people lose things so frequently and just inside their homes so that this device is valuable? Have I missed a market like dementia carers who need to find vital items lost by their charges? I don't know. It seems to me the better idea is to remember where you put things. I've read research that says the more you externalise your thought requirements the less your brain does. IE: people with sat nav have reduced geo-spatial awareness. People that rely on googling info have a smaller general knowledge repository and so on. Still, good luck to them.
Alien
Nice idea but the tags look quite big - otherwise I'd quite like on on my glasses.
As Scion says apart from TV remotes and the like, I wouldn't expect to use it for much else - perhaps my dementia hasn't struck yet!
christopher
I bought a bunch of the original TrackR gear, and to put it bluntly; it's unusable rubbish - the bluetooth is totally unreliable - half my batch simply never worked at all, and the rest drop in and out of sync so much that you may as well not use them at all.
Bluetooth was designed as a replacement for short cables, for which it seems to work well, trying to use it for finding lost stuff is simply not a use case anyone ever had in mind, which is probably why it's so rubbish for this purpose.
It's pretty telling that these guys are crowdfunding again - if this tech worked properly, they could sell it in shops, but if they did that, the number of unhappy customers doing returns would bankrupt them. Taking money from a platform where customers don't complain and can't get refunds is a much better plan for this kind of shoddy product.
John Banister
If they're going to sit in receptacles everywhere, they should build them into devices that provide extra receptacles. But really, what's needed isn't proximity devices, it's things that act like little gps satellites inside your house.