Tiny Houses

Tiny cabin provides off-grid digs in Norway's mountains

Tiny cabin provides off-grid d...
The shelter sits in the mountains of Bergen, Norway (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
The shelter sits in the mountains of Bergen, Norway (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
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The shelter operates off-grid, and there's no electricity and no toilet (Photo: Helge Skodvin)
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The shelter operates off-grid, and there's no electricity and no toilet (Photo: Helge Skodvin)
The shelter has a bed, a wood-burning stove, a large seating area, and what looks like a great view (Photo: Helge Skodvin)
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The shelter has a bed, a wood-burning stove, a large seating area, and what looks like a great view (Photo: Helge Skodvin)
Access to the shelter is gained by a "tuba tunnel" that then leads to an inner door (Photo: Marina Magreøy)
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Access to the shelter is gained by a "tuba tunnel" that then leads to an inner door (Photo: Marina Magreøy)
The Tubakuba Mountain Hub was completed in 2014 (Photo: Espen Folgerø)
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The Tubakuba Mountain Hub was completed in 2014 (Photo: Espen Folgerø)
The shelter sits in the mountains of Bergen, Norway (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
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The shelter sits in the mountains of Bergen, Norway (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
Building the tuba tunnel (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
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Building the tuba tunnel (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
The project is the result of a design-build workshop at Bergen School of Architecture headed by OPA Form architects' Espen Folgerø (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
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The project is the result of a design-build workshop at Bergen School of Architecture headed by OPA Form architects' Espen Folgerø (Photo: Gunnar Sørås)
Measuring 14 sq m (150 sq ft) and described by the architects as somewhere between a tent and a cabin, the shelter was built almost wholly from wood (Photo: Stine Elise Kristoffersen)
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Measuring 14 sq m (150 sq ft) and described by the architects as somewhere between a tent and a cabin, the shelter was built almost wholly from wood (Photo: Stine Elise Kristoffersen)
Architectural drawing of the shelter (Image: OPA Form)
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Architectural drawing of the shelter (Image: OPA Form)
Architectural drawing of the shelter (Image: OPA Form)
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Architectural drawing of the shelter (Image: OPA Form)
Architectural drawing of the shelter (Image: OPA Form)
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Architectural drawing of the shelter (Image: OPA Form)
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The result of a design-build workshop at Bergen's School of Architecture that was headed by OPA Form's Espen Folgerø, the Tubakuba (or Tuba Cube) Mountain Hub is available to anyone to use for one night, for free, but is particularly aimed at families with young kids, in a bid to instill a sense of appreciation for nature in the little ones. It's accessed by a short tunnel that brings to mind something from a fairytale.

Measuring 14 sq m (150 sq ft) and described by the architects as something between a tent and a cabin, the shelter was built in the mountains of Bergen, Norway, almost wholly from wood. The interior is finished in plywood, while the exterior is clad with burned larch, which was treated, like The Observatory, using the Japanese Shou Sugi Ban method of charring to prevent decay.

The shelter has a bed, a wood-burning stove, a large seating area, and what looks like a great view (Photo: Helge Skodvin)
The shelter has a bed, a wood-burning stove, a large seating area, and what looks like a great view (Photo: Helge Skodvin)

The shelter operates off-grid, and there's no electricity and no toilet. It doesn't have an outer door either, but both adults and kids should fit just fine through the so-called "tuba tunnel," and an inner door helps keep out the elements. It does have a couple of choice places to bed-down, a wood-burning stove, a large seating area, and what looks like a great view.

Though the Tubakuba Mountain Hub, which was completed in 2014, certainly doesn't match Antoine's strangeness, it's still a little different from the norm.

Source: OPA Form via Arch Daily

View gallery - 11 images
1 comment
olavn
We in Bergen don't care about this trifle, but we should, for one reason: The pictures indicate it is built in a recreational terrain, where buildings should be illegal, and without a toilet... Shitty art!