Marine

Smarter batteries help U-Boat Worx dive deeper for longer

Smarter batteries help U-Boat ...
U-Boat Worx has upped the depth of its C-Research submarines
U-Boat Worx has upped the depth of its C-Research submarines
View 14 Images
The deep-diving U-Boat Worx C-Research uses a new battery 
1/14
The deep-diving U-Boat Worx C-Research uses a new battery 
The panoramic bubble of the C-Research makes it easier for researchers to see out
2/14
The panoramic bubble of the C-Research makes it easier for researchers to see out
The C-Research 2-500 will take two passengers to 500 meters below the ocean surface
3/14
The C-Research 2-500 will take two passengers to 500 meters below the ocean surface
The 2-500 is the smallest, least capable C-Research
4/14
The 2-500 is the smallest, least capable C-Research
U-Boat Worx will be putting the C-Research on sale in 2018
5/14
U-Boat Worx will be putting the C-Research on sale in 2018
This three-person C-Research will dive to 480 meters
6/14
This three-person C-Research will dive to 480 meters
The 3-480 benefits from an acrylic dome for a panoramic look at the world around it 
7/14
The 3-480 benefits from an acrylic dome for a panoramic look at the world around it 
The 3-480 is designed for undersea exploration
8/14
The 3-480 is designed for undersea exploration
U-Boat Worx has been in the business since 2005
9/14
U-Boat Worx has been in the business since 2005
U-Boat Worx has upped the depth of its C-Research submarines
10/14
U-Boat Worx has upped the depth of its C-Research submarines
The three-person 3-1100 is finished in a special "superyacht paintjob"
11/14
The three-person 3-1100 is finished in a special "superyacht paintjob"
The most capable three-seat U-Boat Worx sub can dive to 1800 meters 
12/14
The most capable three-seat U-Boat Worx sub can dive to 1800 meters 
U-Boat Worx has developed a new battery for its new submarines 
13/14
U-Boat Worx has developed a new battery for its new submarines 
The acrylic dome on the U-Boat Worx submarines gives passengers a better view of the underwater world around them 
14/14
The acrylic dome on the U-Boat Worx submarines gives passengers a better view of the underwater world around them 
View gallery - 14 images

Saying a company is "plumbing new depths" isn't usually a compliment, but it's high praise for U-Boat Worx. The submarine manufacturer has been pushing its creations deeper into the abyss since launching in 2005, and now offers a range of personal and research craft for intrepid ocean explorers. Its latest model line, the C-Researcher, makes use of a new battery for deeper, longer missions on the ocean floor.

The biggest development in the latest U-Boat submarines is a new pressure-tolerant lithium-ion battery system, which allows for a claimed 350 percent improvement in capacity compared to the lead-acid setups. The company says its 62 kWh battery has been tested to 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) below sea level, double the operating window of the deepest-diving C-Research submarine.

Thanks to these bigger batteries, the new submarines take half as long to travel from the surface to the ocean floor, and researchers are able to spend longer under the water than before. They'll also be to use more lights, and run more powerful attachments, which should make it easier to conduct missions in the deepest, darkest corners of the ocean.

The C-Researcher line includes five models all up, starting with the 2-500. As the name suggests, it's a two-person sub capable of diving to 500 meters (1,640 ft). The 2-2000 is the deepest-diving model on offer, capable of taking two passengers to 2,000 meters (6,562 ft) below the surface. There are also three different three-person models available, able to reach 480, 1,100 and 1,700 meters (1,575, 3,609 and 5,577 ft respectively).

Whereas traditional submarines offer a limited view out, U-Boat Worx puts passengers behind a large acrylic sphere for a panoramic look at what's going on around them. That means well-heeled tourists won't miss a thing while exploring Nemo's home, while keen-eyed researchers can conduct their work with an unimpeded view of the subject.

"By combining the latest innovations with over 12 years of experience in designing, building and operating the world's largest fleet of submersibles, our new C-Researcher series offers superyacht owners and deep ocean research communities the safest, best-performing and most luxurious submersibles to explore the underwater world," says company founder Bert Houtman.

The new C-Research submarines will hit the market in Q2 of 2018. There's no details on pricing at this stage, but the tourist models retail for well over US$2 million.

Source: U-Boat Worx

View gallery - 14 images
4 comments
Vernon Miles Kerr
Replace the ducted fans with attitude control nozzles and you have a dandy little rig for exploring around the International Space Station.
ei3io
A submersible should use Hydrogen fuel cells since they last much longer than batteries while also creating oxygen and clean water as byproducts. Both are valued in an enclosed environment with potentially long duration if trapped by something requiring help to arrive hours to days later. Batteries should also exist as redundant back up of course.
highlandboy
#ei3io: Hydrogen fuel cells oxidise Hydrogen and therefore use avalible Oxygen and produce water.
#Vernon Miles Kerr: Space craft are light as they only have to contain air at one Atmosphere of pressure. Submersibles are heavy as they have to keep out many Atmospheres of pressure (roughly 200 Atmospheres at 2000m). This would make the device ill suited for space use.
Don Duncan
Exploration is possible with robots without risking life so why not sit back and watch the video feed? I see no overriding benefit for manned subs.