Bicycles

Bike umbrella has a hole and a hood for your head

Bike umbrella has a hole and a...
The Under Cover bike umbrella in use
The Under Cover bike umbrella in use
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The Under Cover bike umbrella in use
1/5
The Under Cover bike umbrella in use
When not in use, the Under Cover folds/telescopes down into an included nylon bag, which can be Velcro-strapped to the bike's frame
2/5
When not in use, the Under Cover folds/telescopes down into an included nylon bag, which can be Velcro-strapped to the bike's frame
The user's head goes up through a collar tube built into the umbrella, and into an integrated waterproof hood
3/5
The user's head goes up through a collar tube built into the umbrella, and into an integrated waterproof hood
The Under Cover mounts on the bike's down tube, meaning that it doesn't turn back and forth with the handlebars
4/5
The Under Cover mounts on the bike's down tube, meaning that it doesn't turn back and forth with the handlebars
Under Cover users shouldn't get as hot and sweaty as they would in a rain jacket and pants
5/5
Under Cover users shouldn't get as hot and sweaty as they would in a rain jacket and pants
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When it comes to cycling in the rain, probably the best way of staying dry is to simply wear a full-body rain suit. Putting it on and taking it off can be a hassle, though, plus you can get pretty hot underneath it. Using a poncho is one alternative, but German inventor Thomas Schmidt has come up with another … it's a bicycle-mounted umbrella that you stick your head through.

Known as the Under Cover, it mounts on the bike's down tube, meaning that it doesn't turn back and forth with the handlebars. It extends out over the bars in front, and back over the cyclist – or most of their upper body, at least – in the rear. Their head goes up through a collar tube built into the umbrella, and into an integrated waterproof hood.

When not in use, the whole thing folds/telescopes down into an included nylon bag, which can be Velcro-strapped to the bike's frame.

The user's head goes up through a collar tube built into the umbrella, and into an integrated waterproof hood
The user's head goes up through a collar tube built into the umbrella, and into an integrated waterproof hood

So, what's the point? Well, because it isn't a garment that's worn against the body (except for the head), users shouldn't get as hot and sweaty as they would in a rain jacket and pants. That said, the arrangement does look like it could be a little awkward in certain situations, and Schmidt himself doesn't advise using it in strong winds that could catch the umbrella.

It's currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where a pledge of €39 (about US$46) is required to get one. When and if it reaches production, the planned retail price will be about twice as much. It can be seen in use, in the pitch video below.

For other "interesting" approaches to umbrellas for bikes, check out the LeafxPro, the Veltop and Dryve.

Source: Kickstarter

UNDER-COVER - The Bike Umbrella - New Rainprotection for Cyclists

View gallery - 5 images
4 comments
vince
Poncho's on a bike are dangerous. I was wearing one and found out the hard way. Up on a mountain pass I got caught be a ferocious wind blast and it threw the poncho up over my head and I was totally blinded and couldn't see and was on a cliff hanger road with thousand foot drop offs on BOTH sides. All I could see was the road below me and when bike left the pavement and hit gravel I had to pray I could bring it to a stop in time before I was airborne. Made it to live another day. But scary at 40+ mph and you can't possibly throw the poncho back off your body when this happens.
Readout Noise
I'd be concerned about a couple of things. #1: increased air drag, making it harder to cycle. On the one hand, the curved umbrella may have some streamlining benefit; but on the other, it extends a long way out to both sides and has a very large cross sectional area facing forwards. The net effect is probably negative and demands more effort. #2: strong tail winds. They would either blow the umbrella inside out (destroying it), or they would propel you forward like a yacht in full sail and make the bike hard to control.
Bob Flint
Especially when it's dark & rainy you need to be seen, this black umbrella maybe shielding you from some rain, but also any types of lighting that would be much safer than being dry...maybe add some flashing LED's in the ends, minor additional costs for a reasonably priced product.
Aussie_2017
Dumbest thing I ever saw. Wouldn't be better have the umbrella going around the bike, higher than the cyclist head and using a transparent plastic??? At least they would be able to see everything around and also not having the face wet, imagine in a cold rain, this would eve avoid a cold.