Urban Transport

Electric-assist DryCycle gets cyclists out of the rain

Electric-assist DryCycle gets ...
According to the company, the DryCycle can legally be ridden anywhere that bicycles are allowed
According to the company, the DryCycle can legally be ridden anywhere that bicycles are allowed
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According to the company, the DryCycle can legally be ridden anywhere that bicycles are allowed
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According to the company, the DryCycle can legally be ridden anywhere that bicycles are allowed
The DryCycle's lighting system includes high- and low-beam LED headlights, turn indicators, brake and reverse lights, plus flashing front and rear safety lights
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The DryCycle's lighting system includes high- and low-beam LED headlights, turn indicators, brake and reverse lights, plus flashing front and rear safety lights
DryCycle founder Andy Murphy, in one of his vehicles
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DryCycle founder Andy Murphy, in one of his vehicles

Although commuting by bicycle certainly is good for one's self and the environment, there are days when it's just too wet or too cold. It's on just such days, though, that the four-wheeled, fully-enclosed, motor-assisted DryCycle is intended to really shine.

Designed by British cyclist and entrepreneur Andy Murphy, the DryCycle is officially classified as an Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycle. That said, some people would probably think of it as a velomobile, which are typically fully-enclosed recumbent tricycles.

Riders get in and out of the DryCycle by raising and lowering its hinged polycarbonate canopy, and are protected from the elements by its ABS body. Some protection against impacts with cars or other obstacles is additionally provided by a welded aluminum frame, complete with crumple zones – the vehicle reportedly has been crash-tested, indicating an "extremely low" risk of head injury in the event of a front-end collision.

DryCycle founder Andy Murphy, in one of his vehicles
DryCycle founder Andy Murphy, in one of his vehicles

Once they get pedalling, users are assisted by a 250-watt Shimano Steps E8000 motor. The cycle has a top electric-assist speed of 15.5 mph (25 km/h), and can reportedly travel up to 30 miles (48 km) on one four-hour charge of its dual 500-Wh Shimano batteries – a separate 270-Wh battery is used to power its full lighting system and other electronics.

Speaking of which, a Shimano Di2 electronic shifting system allows riders to wirelessly switch between 11 gear ratios. There's also a reverse gear, making it possible to pedal the DryCycle backwards when parking – on most velomobiles, riders simply have to put their feet on the ground Fred Flintstone-style, and "walk" the vehicle back.

Some of its other features include full front and rear suspension, hydraulic disc brakes, sidestick-style steering, an electric horn, and a remote-operated electronic cockpit lock – a heater and a windshield wiper are available as extras. The whole thing weighs a claimed 120 kg (265 lb), which is also its maximum rider/cargo payload.

The DryCycle's lighting system includes high- and low-beam LED headlights, turn indicators, brake and reverse lights, plus flashing front and rear safety lights
The DryCycle's lighting system includes high- and low-beam LED headlights, turn indicators, brake and reverse lights, plus flashing front and rear safety lights

If you're interested in getting a DryCycle of your own, it'll cost you £14,995 (about US$19,358), plus delivery. Prospective buyers can reserve one by placing a £50 ($65) deposit via the Source link below, with shipping expected to take place in the first quarter of next year.

And for examples of other fully-enclosed, electric-assist "quadricycles," check out the Podbike, the PodRide, the Pedilio, and the Velove Armadillo.

Source: DryCycle

12 comments
arjan_peter
insane pricing, ugly design ?
Jack Woodburn
That's gotta be a very hot ride in the summertime. And it's just a matter of time until these velomobiles become more regulated and "licensed" given their assisted speeds.
Douglas Rogers
I really think the lean-to turn trike is a lot better platform, as it is much harder to blow over. It doesn't say if this has regenerative braking and proportional assist. These would be "must haves" at the advertised price.
Altairtech
Exactly what's needed so it fails commercially.
Bruce Anderson
Three points define a plane, so a tadpole design may have been a better choice. Some thought regarding aerodynamics would have been nice.
FabianLamaestra
Heck no for 20k, geez...
nick101
Good idea, comical price.
DryCycle Ltd
Hi Guys, I'm Andy from DryCycle ltd. Thanks for reading about us, and thanks to Ben and New Atlas for writing an article about our new vehicle. I'll try to quickly address some of the comments you've made, also the FAQ section on our website www.DryCycle.co.uk is very comprehensive. So we have 4 wheels instead of 3 as it is inherently more stable, which is important in a taller vehicle like ours. We don't have regenerative braking as it's a Shimano E8000 mid motor so has a freewheeling and cant be used to charge the battery under braking, but it does have proportional assistance and boost modes for the motor. You can vent the canopy easily in summer time, use the fans, or just remove the canopy altogether with quick release quarter turn fixings. It would take a very strong wind to blow a DryCycle over, so that really needn't be a concern, its heavy at 120kg, which the motor overcomes quite nicely. At 15mph aerodynamics are not much of an influence but of course we did shape the vehicle as aerodynamically as reasonably possible. We were far more concerned with comfort, reliability, ease of maintenance (it can be tilted onto it back) and safety. We've had it crash tested by Millbrook Testing Grounds here in the UK and it did really well, here's a video https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3LBRUKcUcwU Thanks for your interest :)
Gyula Bognar
For that much money, one can buy a very good used car. Stupid idea, unless the price is only slightly higher than a regular bicycle. U$1,500.00 would be acceptable.
Kevin Ritchey
Price is insane as are the (lack of) aerodynamics. Cow tipping making a return?