Architecture

Secret shelter installed under a bridge in Spain

Secret shelter installed under...
The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas
The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas
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The shelter makes use of the existing beams under the bridge as rails
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The shelter makes use of the existing beams under the bridge as rails
A  bench, seat, and some shelving are installed under the bridge
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A  bench, seat, and some shelving are installed under the bridge
Abellanas conceived the project to recapture the magic that children experience when hiding under a table cloth, or inside some other secret den 
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Abellanas conceived the project to recapture the magic that children experience when hiding under a table cloth, or inside some other secret den 
Think of it less as a practical dwelling and more as an art installation
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Think of it less as a practical dwelling and more as an art installation
The shelter doesn't pass over a road during its short journey under the bridge so doesn't look too dangerous, though that's still quite a drop at the "studio" end
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The shelter doesn't pass over a road during its short journey under the bridge so doesn't look too dangerous, though that's still quite a drop at the "studio" end
The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas
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The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas
Operating the hand crank to move the shelter into position
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Operating the hand crank to move the shelter into position
The shelter is reportedly part of a collection of spaces Abellanas has planned
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The shelter is reportedly part of a collection of spaces Abellanas has planned
A visitor walks up the banked area and enters the plywood-lined metal shelter, then uses an available hand crank to move it along the bridge's underside to where a bench, seat, and some shelving are waiting
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A visitor walks up the banked area and enters the plywood-lined metal shelter, then uses an available hand crank to move it along the bridge's underside to where a bench, seat, and some shelving are waiting
The shelter is a clever example of parasitic architecture
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The shelter is a clever example of parasitic architecture
A  bench, seat, and some shelving are installed under the bridge
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A  bench, seat, and some shelving are installed under the bridge
The shelter is installed on the underside of an anonymous bridge in Valencia, Spain
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The shelter is installed on the underside of an anonymous bridge in Valencia, Spain
Abellanas conceived the project in an attempt to recapture some of the magic children experience when hiding under a table cloth, or some other secret den
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Abellanas conceived the project in an attempt to recapture some of the magic children experience when hiding under a table cloth, or some other secret den
Though there are no amenities as such, it's possible to make up a bed on the floor with the available bedding and spend the night
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Though there are no amenities as such, it's possible to make up a bed on the floor with the available bedding and spend the night

If trolls really did live under bridges, they could do a lot worse than commission Spaniard Fernando Abellanas to build them a new home. The self-taught designer recently installed a novel shelter under an anonymous traffic bridge in Valencia that includes shelving, seating, and even a sleeping space.

Abellanas conceived the project to try and recapture some of the magic children experience when hiding under a table cloth, or inside some other secret den unnoticed by adults. So it's probably best to think of it less as a practical housing idea and more as an art installation.

The whimsical project is a clever example of parasitic architecture and makes use of the existing beams under the bridge as rails. The idea is, a visitor walks up the banked area and enters the plywood-lined metal shelter, then uses an available hand crank to move it along the bridge's underside to where a bench, seat, and some shelving are waiting. Though there are no amenities as such, it's possible to make up a bed on the floor with the available bedding and spend the night.

Though there are no amenities as such, it's possible to make up a bed on the floor with the available bedding and spend the night
Though there are no amenities as such, it's possible to make up a bed on the floor with the available bedding and spend the night

"My work as a designer consists [of] trying to implement the concerns relating to design, handicrafts and architecture which I come across on a daily basis," explains Abellanas. "I observe, research and develop projects, in a self-taught way, with the only purpose of satisfying my own personal motivation. With the experience I acquired during years of work I collaborate with artists, interior designers and architects offering them design and manufacturing solutions. All this I do under the name of Lebrel."

According to The Spaces, the shelter is the first of a collection of similar projects Abellanas has planned.

Check out the video below to see more of the secret shelter.

Source: Lebrel

Refugiarse de la ciudad en la propia ciudad.

9 comments
Bob Flint
The person is deaf, or shortly will be. Seemingly he doesn't mind spending his time hiding under a bridge, the vibrations, noise, smells, and likely pigeons vying for his homestead all the while not having even the simple comforts such as a toilet, water, & food for more than a couple of days...
Ralf Biernacki
@Bob: "not having even the simple comforts such as a toilet. . ." A hole in the floor is all the toilet he needs, and not even that if he is reasonably agile. :-))
Brian M
Of course bridges have been a source of living spaces before in centuries passed - Think of the old river bridges of London, Paris etc., with lots of houses built on them. Although over a motorway might be a bit less attractive compared to a river!
JimFox
Immediately I thought-- 'homeless people'. Silly really, the costs would be too much, though the security aspect is good. Bet there'd be plenty of takers if it was cheap.
Nik
Pigeon droppings are bad, but humans..........?
Grunchy
I think it's great! I immediately thought of Confederation Bridge which has a hollow corridor along its length. Not secret, but not well-known.
christopher
@Brian clearly hasn't visited California in the last decade! If they could ship 115,738 of these there, they could solve the homeless problem.
bwana4swahili
Not very "secret" if an article is written on it!
Sergiuss
Bridges and viaducts could become buildings, just as buildings could be structured to have a highway over them. This would facilitate access to the building as well as the exit, freeing the anachronistic streets for support activities. These highways would be the perfect place for the new autonomous vehicles.