Medical

Device goes up the nose to permanently improve breathing

Device goes up the nose to per...
Dr. Brad Otto uses the Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device on a volunteer
Dr. Brad Otto uses the Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device on a volunteer
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The Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device applies radiofrequency energy to cartilage in the nose
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The Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device applies radiofrequency energy to cartilage in the nose
Dr. Brad Otto uses the Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device on a volunteer
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Dr. Brad Otto uses the Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device on a volunteer

If you have chronic nasal congestion, it could be due to an obstruction caused by the shape of your internal nasal valve. A new device is designed to permanently address the problem, without the need for surgery.

While medication and breathing strips or stents can help to temporarily open up problematic nasal valves, surgery is typically the only long-term solution. Aerin Medical's non-invasive Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device, however, is now also claimed to do the job permanently. It does so via a quick outpatient procedure performed in a doctor's office, in which radiofrequency energy is applied to cartilage using a wand that is inserted up the nose.

"What this technology does is reshape the internal nasal valve region, which is a region where cartilage on the side of your nose meets your septum," says The Ohio State University's Dr. Brad Otto, leader of an ongoing clinical trial. "Basically what it causes the cartilage to do is barely denature and change its shape just a little bit in order to open up that valve and improve airflow to that region."

The Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device applies radiofrequency energy to cartilage in the nose
The Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device applies radiofrequency energy to cartilage in the nose

CT scans are taken before and after the procedure, in order to see how the air flow through the patient's nasal cavity is affected.

Should you be interested in taking part in the clinical trial, its organizers are still recruiting test subjects, and can be contacted online. There's more information on the device in the video below.

Sources: The Ohio State University, Aerin Medical

Nasal Anatomy MICROSITE MKT516.B

4 comments
VincentWolf
God could I use this for my nose. Damn things keeps shifting from left to right nostril and even after surgery it still does that and I can only breathe out of one side at a time. Sucks
FabianLamaestra
I really want to do this, however adding two CT scans is concerning. The amount of millirems given off by a single CT scan is incredibly High. Having two CT scans done nearly back-to-back would concern me. Hopefully they get good enough at using this machine where they don't need to do any CT scans.
IvanWashington
I would volunteer if it was in Washington state.
Nik
The success of this procedure will depend entirely upon the skill of the operator, and that can typically be very variable, depending on whether the operator is having a good day or a bad day. The horror stories of bad surgery and its results abound, so, I'd be very wary of any procedure that is likely to have irreversible results, because if they are bad, you'd have to live with a worse condition, for ever!