Children

Children's night light projects their parents' live flight map

The WestJet Flight Light will be beta-tested this summer
The WestJet Flight Light will be beta-tested this summer
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The WestJet Flight Light projects a continuously-updated flight map onto a child's bedroom ceiling
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The WestJet Flight Light projects a continuously-updated flight map onto a child's bedroom ceiling
The WestJet Flight Light will be beta-tested this summer
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The WestJet Flight Light will be beta-tested this summer
Once the flight reaches its destination, the plane on the map pulses accordingly
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Once the flight reaches its destination, the plane on the map pulses accordingly

Air travellers have become fairly used to onboard live flight maps, that show how far their plane is from its destination. Canadian airline WestJet is now introducing a device that projects such maps within children's bedrooms, letting them know how soon their parents will be home.

Called the WestJet Flight Light, the airplane-shaped gadget (when viewed from above) is linked by Bluetooth to a nearby smartphone running a dedicated app.

When the travelling parent is about to leave on their flight home, they enter their flight number into that same app, thus indicating that they're on their way. The internet-connected application then tracks their flight in real time, relaying the data to the Flight Light. That device in turn projects a continuously-updated flight map onto the child's bedroom ceiling.

The WestJet Flight Light projects a continuously-updated flight map onto a child's bedroom ceiling
The WestJet Flight Light projects a continuously-updated flight map onto a child's bedroom ceiling

Parents can also use the app to send text messages to their kids while en route, with those messages appearing on the ceiling alongside the map. Once the flight reaches its destination, the plane on the map pulses accordingly.

When neither parent is travelling, the Flight Light doubles as a plain ol' night light. Additionally, its central cylindrical section can be removed and used like a flashlight that projects an airplane symbol onto walls, pets, or whatever it's pointed at.

Plans call for the system to be beta-tested this summer (Northern Hemisphere). It's demonstrated in the video below.

Source: WestJet

WestJet Flight Light

3 comments
Mr T
So the child is watching the flight map, when the plane disappears, not a good idea. Fortunately, plane crashes are rare, but does anyone want their child to find out that way?
Elizane09
"linked by Bluetooth to a nearby smartphone running a dedicated app." Another electronic play-toy for adults that will be obsolete in 6 months.
Mr Alex
It is really saddening to think that there would be a market for this because so many parents are constantly away from home. Without the parent there the closest the child can get is a representation of their location, also serving as a constant reminder of how far away the parent is.