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From Zera-to-compost in 24 hours flat

From Zera-to-compost in 24 hou...
The Zera Food Recycler (at end of kitchen island) composts kitchen waste
The Zera Food Recycler (at end of kitchen island) composts kitchen waste
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The planned retail price of the Zera Food Recycler is $1,199
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The planned retail price of the Zera Food Recycler is $1,199
The Zera Food Recycler (at end of kitchen island) composts kitchen waste
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The Zera Food Recycler (at end of kitchen island) composts kitchen waste

Composting your household organic waste is a highly-commendable thing to do, but compost heaps do have some limitations – they take a long time to convert waste to soil, they can attract pests, and you're not supposed to put meat scraps in them. Well, apparently none of those things apply to a new appliance known as the Zera Food Recycler.

Designed by Whirlpool Corporation's innovation incubator, WLabs, the Zera sits in your kitchen instead of out in your backyard.

Users start each cycle by throwing a paper packet of Zera Additive into its central bin – that additive consists of coir (coconut husk fiber) and baking soda. Vegetable, meat and dairy food waste (with the exception of bones and fruit pits) is subsequently dumped into it throughout the week. A sliding lid along with a replaceable HEPA/carbon filter help keep odors at bay.

The planned retail price of the Zera Food Recycler is $1,199
The planned retail price of the Zera Food Recycler is $1,199

Once the bin is full, a motorized auger-style blade sets about mixing, slicing and aerating everything. That mixture is also heated. It is claimed that within 24 hours, the contents of the bin (including the additive packet) will be rendered into nutrient-rich soil. That soil can be retrieved from a smaller bin, in the bottom of the Zera.

It all sounds pretty good, although keep in mind that users will have to keep buying filters and packets of additive.

If you're interested in getting one, the Zera is currently the subject of an Indiegogo campaign that has far-exceeded its funding goal. A pledge of US$999 will get you one (including a filter and one month's supply of additive), if everything works out. The planned retail price is $1,199.

Source: Indiegogo

6 comments
VincentWolf
I can buy compost at big box stores for a fraction of the cost of that machine! No thanks!
Mayakovski
Cool idea, but that price is ridiculous. I could have about 20 manual composers for the price of one of these and not need electricity, packets of additive, etc. Make it $200.00 and I'll get in line.
MarkTrounce
Or you could do this: No power- Low-Cost, may not want it in the kitchen option: https://youtu.be/KaIbKjDaMEg
Wolf0579
I have just one question. Why does a corporation need to use indiegogo to fund a product development? Shouldn't there a prohibition on corporations from taking further advantage of consumers, by using such platforms?!? If we don't regain control over corporate behavior, we puny earthlings will be extinct in the name of profits.
PAV
I think the extra cost is in order to have the process take only 24hrs rather than 24 days or even 3 months.
Bob Flint
What is the rush to have the compost? At that price & operating cost's & expendable's you should be ashamed of even thinking to try and dupe the public with this BS...most municipalities already have weekly pick-up.