Good Thinking

Zore quick-draw lock dials in gun safety

Zore quick-draw lock dials in ...
When it comes to unlocking the gun, users enter a pin code by turning a dial on the side of the attachment
When it comes to unlocking the gun, users enter a pin code by turning a dial on the side of the attachment
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When it comes to unlocking the gun, users enter a pin code by turning a dial on the side of the attachment
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When it comes to unlocking the gun, users enter a pin code by turning a dial on the side of the attachment
Zore is running an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for commercial production of its smart gun lock
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Zore is running an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for commercial production of its smart gun lock
Stopping guns falling into the wrong hands would put a serious dent in the amount of firearm-related deaths
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Stopping guns falling into the wrong hands would put a serious dent in the amount of firearm-related deaths
The lock also comes with a Bluetooth LE module that speaks to a companion smartphone app
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The lock also comes with a Bluetooth LE module that speaks to a companion smartphone app

The latest effort to improve gun safety comes from Israeli startup Zore, which has developed a lock that provides access to a firearm in response to a personalized pin code, offering what the company claims is fast access to the weapon in any circumstances, including the dark.

Stopping guns falling into the wrong hands would put a serious dent in the amount of firearm-related deaths. Fingerprint sensors, GPS tracking and smart guns that fire only when in the hands of somebody wearing a custom wristwatch are a few ways that companies are looking to solve this problem, but Zore is taking another approach focused on maintaining ready access to the weapon in case of an emergency.

Its Zore X gun lock is much like a regular single-dial combination lock, but can be fixed to a semi-automatic gun. Users can lock the weapon simply by pressing a button on top, which places a custom-made cartridge into the chamber to prevent it being loaded up with more dangerous projectiles.

When it comes to unlocking the gun, users enter a pin code by turning a dial on the side of the attachment. This user-defined pin code can be as short as two numbers, or something a little longer and more complex. According to its creators, the Zore X can be unlocked regardless of the dial's starting point or which direction it is turned, making for the "fastest way" to go from a locked gun to a ready-to-fire weapon.

Stopping guns falling into the wrong hands would put a serious dent in the amount of firearm-related deaths
Stopping guns falling into the wrong hands would put a serious dent in the amount of firearm-related deaths

The lock also comes with a Bluetooth LE module that enables communication with a companion smartphone app. This combines with a built-in motion sensor to allow for push notifications should the user's gun be tampered with when it is out of sight. This is powered through a replaceable CR2 battery that the company claims will last a year of use. The app also allows the user to unlock their gun from within the app, and comes with training exercises designed to hone the user's physical unlocking skills.

Zore is running an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for commercial production of its smart gun lock. At the time of writing, US$95 early pledges are available, which will have a Zore X headed your way in February in 2017 if all goes to plan.

You can check out the team's pitch video below.

Source: Zore

ZORE is live on Indiegogo!

7 comments
piperTom
Often there is little enough time to draw your weapon; thumbing a code into it is going to get you killed. Speaking of drawing, concealed carry is out of the question with that big bump on the side. Keep working guys; you're not close to useful security, yet.
CliffG
piperTom, you'd wish you had that big bump when someone disarms you and shoots you with your own weapon. You and the NRA will fight to the end, as you know that a practical solution to gun safety like this one will trigger an avalanche of common sense regulations. P.S. the rest of us are sick of the carnage you and your ilk are perpetrating on this nation.
TryingToThink
piperTom, it didn't look like the lock was on the firearms while carrying them. I think they were making the statement that you should always train. It looks like a good lock for the home, especially in states that require firearms be locked if they aren't on your person. Seems ideal for the bedside if you want to follow the laws.
Hebrew_Hammer
@piperTom - who said anything about concealed carry? Having any kind of external locking mechanism on your gun when you are concealed carrying is a ridiculous thought to even consider. Please tell us you weren't thinking of that. This device is obviously not for concealed carry... In my opinion this has a very dynamic and versatile use, but since you want them to "keep working" perhaps you could provide gizmag with links to some ideas you're "working" on..? Is this the end all be all to gun safety? Nope, not so sure anyone has come out with that.......ever.
ljaques
Fast gun locks are better than slow gun locks, BUT... Gun safety means getting guns out of the hands of CRIMINALS. All the gun laws take them out of the hands of the public, who would defend others from the bad guys. They do not take them out of the hands of the criminals. Ban -gang- membership, not guns. This was posted on Facebook the other day: Let's Do Some Math Using the CDC Numbers: There were 32,000 gun deaths last year. 60% are suicides - 19,200 3% are accidents - 960 4% are justified - 1,280 33% are homicides -10,560 80% of homicides are gang related - 8,448 That leaves 1,712 people in a country with a population of 312 million. You have a 0.00010256410256% chance of death by firearm. If you are not part of a gang, don't commit crime, or plan on committing suicide, you have a 0.000008564102564% chance of death by firearm. Guns are not a problem. The media and your elected officials are lying to you, America. -- I thought that summed it up pretty darned well. (CliffG, please read that again.) For those who choose to use firearm locks, I hope the Israeli lock does well, because when you need your weapon do defend yourself, you need it RIGHT NOW. The quicker you can get your weapon into service, the safer you are.
Wolf0579
No. Seriously, no. No lock is ever going to be a good idea on a gun... from the owner's perspective. For all you people who want to disarm the public, spend a few nights in a ghetto without any protection. Now it seems we have to be worried about the police murdering us, too.
attoman
The only good lock is one that unlocks immediately only for the owner. No children. No thieves. It also must not work for mass murder. We who invented Silicon Valley know how, do you?