Tiny Houses

Portland tiny house rotates to follow the sun

359 measures 12 x 12 ft (3.6 x 3.6 m) and comprises 144 sq ft (13 sq m) of floorspace
359 measures 12 x 12 ft (3.6 x 3.6 m) and comprises 144 sq ft (13 sq m) of floorspace
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Path Architecture is currently working on new iterations of the tiny home that are fully off-grid, and these will include composting toilets and roof-based solar array
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Path Architecture is currently working on new iterations of the tiny home that are fully off-grid, and these will include composting toilets and roof-based solar array
359 measures 12 x 12 ft (3.6 x 3.6 m) and comprises 144 sq ft (13 sq m) of floorspace
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359 measures 12 x 12 ft (3.6 x 3.6 m) and comprises 144 sq ft (13 sq m) of floorspace
Inside, there's a kitchen, lounge area and bathroom with shower and toilet downstairs, while upstairs includes a small sleeping area
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Inside, there's a kitchen, lounge area and bathroom with shower and toilet downstairs, while upstairs includes a small sleeping area
The large glazed section and access at the front of the home
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The large glazed section and access at the front of the home
The upstairs sleeping area
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The upstairs sleeping area

Portland-based Path Architecture recently completed a very charming tiny house. Dubbed 359, the home comprises generous glazing and is set on a manually-operated rotating base, which allows it to easily follow (or indeed face away from) the sun, warming the interior naturally and providing plenty of natural light.

The tiny house measures 12 x 12 ft (3.6 x 3.6 m) and comprises a total of 144 sq ft (13 sq m) of floorspace split over two levels, with a large glazed section and access at the front.

The interior features high ceilings, which help it feel larger than it is, and includes a kitchen, lounge area and toilet with shower on the ground floor, while stairs lead to a small sleeping area. A single small heater keeps the home warm.

Inside, there's a kitchen, lounge area and bathroom with shower and toilet downstairs, while upstairs includes a small sleeping area
Inside, there's a kitchen, lounge area and bathroom with shower and toilet downstairs, while upstairs includes a small sleeping area

Path Architecture's Benjamin Kaiser told us that the home is installed on a property in Portland. It was originally designed as a fully off-grid dwelling but the owners wanted a flushing toilet, so once it was connected for water and sewage, it made little sense to restrict the home from receiving electricity.

However, the firm is currently working on the next iterations of its tiny house that operate fully off-grid, and these will include a composting toilet and a roof-based solar array.

The video below shows the tiny house being rotated.

Source: Path Architecture via Treehugger

359 Rotation

8 comments
Helios
Bells and whistles don't make for intelligent design. Overhangs and limitation of excess glazing would have been better. A house on a lazy susan increases cost and complexity unnecessarily.
rseifer
This is a terrific idea. It can be used to defeat process servers or bill collectors who come up to knock on the door, simply by accelerating the rotation speed and let centrifugal force throw them out into space (or at least into the neighbor's yard). Ralph L. Seifer, Long Beach, California
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that is really neat.
Paul Anthony
I'd be interested in knowing how they achieved the waste out and utilities in but still rotated the house. Is it done with flex tubing or is it some sort of centrally located swivel?
Bob Flint
I bet the prevailing winds will have a fun time with this structure, not to mention you'll need a 360 degree walkway to shovel in winter....
Douglas Bennett Rogers
Put a tire and solar rate motor on the pole. Solar cells can then track. Would also lock against wind. Or let the wind rotate it and power a generator.
Daishi
This would make water, sewage, and electric lines really problematic. It's like all of the problems of being fully mobile but without the mobility part and none of the tax benefits. This idea should have died on the back of the napkin but it's their money (I hope).
Giulio
Actually, a rotating house was built in Canberra (Australia) several years ago. See for example: http://www.liveability.com.au/inspiration/girasole-the-rotating-house/
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