Aircraft

CityHawk VTOL preordered by New York-based EMS organization

CityHawk VTOL preordered by Ne...
Rendering of how the CityHawk might look in Hatzolah livery
Rendering of how the CityHawk might look in Hatzolah livery
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Rendering of how the CityHawk might look in Hatzolah livery
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Rendering of how the CityHawk might look in Hatzolah livery
The CityHawk is intended for emergency response applications
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The CityHawk is intended for emergency response applications
The CityHawk will accommodate a pilot, patient and companion, two EMS personnel, and a full suite of onboard life support equipment
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The CityHawk will accommodate a pilot, patient and companion, two EMS personnel, and a full suite of onboard life support equipment
The CityHawk is also targeted at corporate and personal transport applications
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The CityHawk is also targeted at corporate and personal transport applications
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The CityHawk variant of Urban Aeronautics' Cormorant military VTOL aircraft has taken a step towards being used in emergency medical service (EMS) applications. Following the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with New York-based Hatzolah Air in August 2020, the non-profit medical transport organization has now preordered four of the aircraft.

Emergency response in urban areas would appear to be an ideal application for VTOL aircraft like the CityHawk, where a prompt response or a delay due to traffic congestion can literally be the difference between life and death for injured parties.

With a compact footprint comparable to a large car and its ducted fan design housing the rotor blades internally so they don't pose a risk to people and property like a traditional helicopter's, it's envisioned the CityHawk could safely land on city streets – something Hatzolah's fixed-wing aircraft obviously can't do. Urban Aeronautics says its jet-propelled aircraft is also quieter and boasts 20 to 30 percent more cabin space than a helicopter.

“Hatzolah’s pre-order of four air ambulance CityHawks is an amazing show of confidence in our program and in our company,” says Nimrod Golan-Yanay, CEO of Urban Aeronautics. “We look forward to delivering on our promise to revolutionize urban air mobility and the emergency response capabilities of major cities across the world.”

The CityHawk is intended for emergency response applications
The CityHawk is intended for emergency response applications

Capabilities are one thing, but regulations may be a bigger hurdle to clear. However, Urban Aeronautics is aiming to receive FAA certification of the CityHawk for EMS use and be ready to go into production within three to five years.

The Israeli aerospace company will work with Hatzolah to tailor the aircraft for EMS use. Requirements include space for the pilot, a patient and companion, two EMS personnel, and a full suite of onboard life support equipment.

The CityHawk will accommodate a pilot, patient and companion, two EMS personnel, and a full suite of onboard life support equipment
The CityHawk will accommodate a pilot, patient and companion, two EMS personnel, and a full suite of onboard life support equipment

The freshly inked agreement will also see Hatzolah Air become the official sales representative and distribution channel for the CityHawk to other EMS and rescue organizations around the world.

“We are excited to become not just the worldwide distributor of Urban Aeronautics Air Ambulance CityHawk, but its first customer as well” said Eli Rowe, President of Hatzolah Air.“Hatzolah’s mission is always about patient care and adding the VTOL CityHawk has the potential to save many thousands of lives every year.”

Emergency response is just one of the applications Urban Aeronautics envisions for the CityHawk, with other variants planned for use as air taxis and corporate and personal transport.

Source: Urban Aeronautics

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7 comments
mediabeing
Nothing about crash protection/amelioration. Nothing about air bags, emergency foam release, auto proximity guard, etc.
Oh well.
Nelson Hyde Chick
Another noisy thing in an already too loud urban environment.
BlueOak
What could go wrong?
guzmanchinky
I can't think of a better way to get in and out of street level in a city.
christopher
They got the drawing wrong - it should be a crashed upside down CityHawk with an emergency vehicle wheeled extracting the bodies from it, not the other way around.

Good luck getting FAA approval to fly a killer machine with no safety provision whatsoever over the top of crowded city streets.
Towerman
What a bunch of mindless responses !
@mediabeng, DOH ! Son get an education, then try and understand how it works.@Nelson Hyde Chick: Another NOISY comment from you with zero meaningful insight. Wake up and smell thje coffee son, supercars and motorbikes are real... and btw have been certified for decades ;) @ Blue Oak, another Doh ! moment.... what can go wrong stepping into anything that moves that exists today ?? O... i guess it slipped your mind...hint (look at accident statistics all over the world)
@guzmanchinky... I agree indeed, what an awesome MACHINE this is ! ! ! @christopher Sorry son, YOU got it wrong, you are absolutely clueless and clearly have no understanding on how it operates and how it is designed.
Arcticshade
Excellent ! ! ! Cityhawk is THE EVTOL the world should STRIVE to replicate, If i had worked for this company i would put in hours of 24/7 to bring it to the public SOONER !