Bicycles

Airshot gives tubeless mountain bike tires a kick in the seating

Airshot gives tubeless mountai...
Airshot seats tubeless tires by delivering ... well, an air shot
Airshot seats tubeless tires by delivering ... well, an air shot
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Airshot seats tubeless tires by delivering ... well, an air shot
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Airshot seats tubeless tires by delivering ... well, an air shot
Airshot is basically a reusable compressed air canister that can be filled up by the user via a regular floor pump
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Airshot is basically a reusable compressed air canister that can be filled up by the user via a regular floor pump

Tubeless mountain bike tires definitely have their good points, such as lower weight, less flats and decreased rolling resistance. In order to seat the things securely on the rim, however, it's often necessary to use a compressor or a CO2 cartridge to deliver a high-pressure shot of air. That said, there's now another option, in the form of the Airshot.

Similar in concept to the RideAir, the Airshot is basically a reusable compressed air canister that can be filled up by the user via a regular floor pump. It can hold a maximum pressure of 160 psi (11 bar).

Airshot is basically a reusable compressed air canister that can be filled up by the user via a regular floor pump
Airshot is basically a reusable compressed air canister that can be filled up by the user via a regular floor pump

When it's time to seat a new tire – or reseat one that has "burped" off – you just connect the Airshot's inflation hose to the tire's valve stem, release a shot of air from the canister, and wait until you hear the bead pop onto the rim. It's not unlike what you'd do with a CO2 cartridge, although the Airshot is reusable and can presumably seat several tires on one fill.

While the device does appear to be a little too large to bother bringing along on rides, it's certainly an appealing alternative to seeking out an air compressor, using up a cartridge, or replacing your perfectly-good floor pump with a tubeless-friendly Bontrager TLR Flash Charger.

The Airshot can be ordered from its UK-based manufacturer's website, for £59.99 (about US$94). It's demonstrated in the video below.

Source: Airshot via BikeRadar


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3 comments
Paul Anthony
Two questions? How do you get that kind of pressure and from what source?
sk8dad
Paul, Presumably, from a standard shock pump.
DanLapoint
So for $20 more, you can just get the Bonty flash charger, which is also a pump.. Explain to me why I should pay nearly $100 for what is quite literally a bottle with a valve on it?