Bicycles

Review: 560G is claimed to be "world's lightest high-security bike lock"

Review: 560G is claimed to be ...
The Altor 560G in its natural habitat
The Altor 560G in its natural habitat
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The 560G weighs just 1.23 lb (or 560 grams, hence the name)
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The 560G weighs just 1.23 lb (or 560 grams, hence the name)
The Altor 560G in its natural habitat
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The Altor 560G in its natural habitat
When not in use, the 560G folds down to a compact package that's much easier to tote than a U-lock
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When not in use, the 560G folds down to a compact package that's much easier to tote than a U-lock
While a key is used to open the thing, the 560G's spring-loaded mechanism can be locked simply by pressing it down with a thumb
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While a key is used to open the thing, the 560G's spring-loaded mechanism can be locked simply by pressing it down with a thumb

When it comes to bike locks, there are two main types: heavy but effective U-locks, and lighter but less secure setups such as cables with padlocks. Well, Altor Locks is out to change that. Its compact new 560G weighs just 1.23 lb (or 560 grams, hence the name), yet is claimed to be extremely theft-resistant. We recently had the chance to try out a demo unit for ourselves.

The 560G is composed of four solid Grade 5 titanium rods, linked together by stainless steel rivets. Unlike the case with some other folding locks, those links incorporate titanium shields (the gold bits in the photos). This design reportedly makes it much more difficult for would-be bike thieves to gain leverage within the link, in an attempt to pop the rivet out.

While a key is used to open the thing, the 560G's spring-loaded mechanism can be locked simply by pressing it down with a thumb – no key required. When not in use, the lock folds down to a compact package that's much easier to tote than a U-lock.

When not in use, the 560G folds down to a compact package that's much easier to tote than a U-lock
When not in use, the 560G folds down to a compact package that's much easier to tote than a U-lock

We definitely liked the solid feel of the 560G, and found that it could quite easily fit around a bicycle's frame, rear wheel, and an adjacent object such as a bike rack or sign post. Additionally, it was a simple matter to run a cable lock through it to secure the front wheel.

The anodized finish looks nice, and the consumer version should have smoother edges to keep it from scratching the bike's paint.

The 560G weighs just 1.23 lb (or 560 grams, hence the name)
The 560G weighs just 1.23 lb (or 560 grams, hence the name)

Because the folks at Altor actually wanted the lock back in an unmarred state, we weren't able to conduct any "torture tests" on it. If the videos on the company website are to be believed, though, it can certainly hold its own against bolt cutters, hacksaws, and hammers with chisels.

The 560G is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where a pledge of US$150 will get you one – assuming everything goes as planned. The estimated retail price is $200.

Sources: Altor Locks, Kickstarter

5 comments
Fronty
Wow, a lock with some pretty bold claims is reviewed, and not tested because they wanted the lock back "unmarred state". Titanium is MUCH weaker than steel for the same size, and those bars are pretty thin. Seems a pretty big stretch to call that a high security lock. You'd be much better off with a quality steel lock.
Bob Flint
Great this style lock has at least five weak points.....
Timelord
Give me a cordless angle grinder and 60 seconds and we'll see how "high security" this is. And while repeating "Grade 5 titanium" might sound impressive to the uninitiated, I already have components and parts made from that material (more commonly referred to as 6Al-4V or just 6-4) on my bikes. It's light, but not some wonder metal. That's just marketing-speak to get people suckered in. "Grade 5! Better than grades 1 through 4!" Never mind that there are 38 grades, and higher doesn't necessarily mean better physical properties.
unklmurray
The best bike lock I've had is a cover over the entire bike that hides the bike and ALL OF IT'S PARTS you lock it up and then cover it with a nylon cover bag and lock it N2 place and the thieves don't even mess with it!!........LOL :-)
EdwinaBadmon
Yeah you can't just go up to a bike and use a cordless grinder to cut titanium, you need lots of coolant and very slow feed rates. These commentators must be experts in the bike lock industry to easily poo pooh in what seems like an innovative design that is difficult to put any leverage on the joints. $200 is kinda spendy but if I can afford I would get one for its weight specifically. Use a little common sense in security and this lock can be very formidable against thieves. The bike will get trashed but still be there.