Bicycles

AM1 e-bike keeps it minimalist and lightweight

AM1 e-bike keeps it minimalist...
Including the battery cylinder, the AM1 e-bike tips the scales at just 13.5 kg
Including the battery cylinder, the AM1 e-bike tips the scales at just 13.5 kg
View 7 Images
The AM1 e-bike has a 24 V Samsung battery unit in water-resistant housing that sits to the bottom of the seat tube
1/7
The AM1 e-bike has a 24 V Samsung battery unit in water-resistant housing that sits to the bottom of the seat tube
The AM1's 200 W motor will provide up to 15.5 mph of electric drive assist
2/7
The AM1's 200 W motor will provide up to 15.5 mph of electric drive assist
The AM1 comes with a standard diamond frame, or an easy access Step frame
3/7
The AM1 comes with a standard diamond frame, or an easy access Step frame
The single-speed AM1 e-bike comes with a 24 C battery pack and a 200 W electric motor
4/7
The single-speed AM1 e-bike comes with a 24 C battery pack and a 200 W electric motor
Riders can select three levels of electric assist on the AM1's LED display
5/7
Riders can select three levels of electric assist on the AM1's LED display
Analog Motion founders Nav Gornall and Jack Chalkley with the AM1 e-bike
6/7
Analog Motion founders Nav Gornall and Jack Chalkley with the AM1 e-bike
Including the battery cylinder, the AM1 e-bike tips the scales at just 13.5 kg
7/7
Including the battery cylinder, the AM1 e-bike tips the scales at just 13.5 kg
View gallery - 7 images

Bicycles packing an electric motor to help flatten out hills or get riders to work without breaking a sweat can stray quite a bit from the classic form of a traditional two wheeler. There are notable exceptions of course, and if it wasn't for its line-spoiling battery cylinder, the AM1 from Analog Motion could pass for just about any other city bike in a line-up.

"It looks like a bike, handles like a bike, weighs the same as a bike but rides like you're freewheeling downhill with a tailwind," said London-based Analog Motion. The single speed AM1 tips the scales at just 13.5 kg (30 lb), including the 24 V Samsung battery unit in water-resistant housing that sits to the bottom of the seat tube on the standard version and the aluminum frame's down tube on the easy access Step flavor. That battery is reported good for 20 miles per charge.

The AM1 includes a 200 W motor for up to 15.5 mph (25 km/h) of electric drive assist, with three levels available on the LED display on the handlebars of both standard and Step models, but those who opt for the Plus versions will get five levels of assist and an LCD display.

Riders can select three levels of electric assist on the AM1's LED display
Riders can select three levels of electric assist on the AM1's LED display

Stopping power comes courtesy of Promax rim brakes for the AM1 and AM1 Step, with the Plus variants getting an upgrade to Tektro mechanical disc brakes. Each of the standard AM1s get lightweight sport seating, while riders of the Plus models are treated to sprung seats. All have 40 mm alloy rims with Kenda KWEST 28c tires. And if a component fails or riders want to customize their rides, Analog Motion reckons that 90 percent of the parts are compatible with those found on the shelves at a local bike store.

The AM1 project has already sped past its rather modest campaign goal with roughly 2 weeks left to run. Pledges start at £599 (about US$790) for an AM1 or AM1 Step, rising to £749 for the Plus models. If all goes to plan, shipping is estimated to start in February 2019. The video below has more.

Sources: Analog Motion, Kickstarter

The AM1 electric bike - it's a bike with a motor

View gallery - 7 images
1 comment
ljaques
Hmm, $750-800 for only a single-speed, no-suspension, 24v, 200w ebike?