Architecture

Pirelli building renovation project to be breath of fresh air for Milan

Pirelli building renovation pr...
According to the press release, the building's greenery will absorb 14 tons of CO2 and produce 9 tons of oxygen per year, which is, says Stefano Boeri Architetti, the equivalent of installing a 10,000 sq m (roughly 106,000 sq ft) forest in Milan
According to the press release, the building's greenery will absorb 14 tons of CO2 and produce 9 tons of oxygen per year, which is, says Stefano Boeri Architetti, the equivalent of installing a 10,000 sq m (roughly 106,000 sq ft) forest in inner-city Milan
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"This project will reinvigorate the iconic former Pirellino building, creating a new tower that mixes architecture and nature to create a green space that is open to the whole city," says Stefano Boeri, who has lots of prior experience creating greenery covered buildings
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"This project will reinvigorate the iconic former Pirellino building, creating a new tower that mixes architecture and nature to create a green space that is open to the whole city," says Stefano Boeri, who has lots of prior experience creating greenery covered buildings
Pirelli 39's new tower will derive an impressive 65 percent of its total electricity needs from solar power
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Pirelli 39's new tower will derive an impressive 65 percent of its total electricity needs from solar power
The old Pirellino office tower and the new greenery covered skyscraper will be connected by a greenery filled bridge
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The old Pirellino office tower and the new greenery covered skyscraper will be connected by a greenery filled bridge
According to the press release, the building's greenery will absorb 14 tons of CO2 and produce 9 tons of oxygen per year, which is, says Stefano Boeri Architetti, the equivalent of installing a 10,000 sq m (roughly 106,000 sq ft) forest in Milan
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According to the press release, the building's greenery will absorb 14 tons of CO2 and produce 9 tons of oxygen per year, which is, says Stefano Boeri Architetti, the equivalent of installing a 10,000 sq m (roughly 106,000 sq ft) forest in inner-city Milan
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Two prestigious architecture firms, Stefano Boeri Architetti and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, have joined forces to envision an ambitious reimagining of Milan's existing Pirellino (aka Pirelli Tower) and the immediate area. The project will involve the renovation of an old office tower and the construction of an adjacent plant-covered skyscraper, with an attractive greenery filled bridge connecting the two.

Named Pirelli 39, the project is being commissioned by COIMA SGR following an international architecture competition. The most notable aspect is the new residential tower. It's not clear yet how tall the new building will be, but we do know it will feature a considerable 1,700 sq m (18,300 sq ft) of vegetation on its facade, specifically chosen to change colors as the seasons change.

According to the press release, the building's greenery will absorb 14 tons of CO2 and produce 9 tons of oxygen per year, which is, says Stefano Boeri Architetti, the equivalent of installing a 10,000 sq m (roughly 106,000 sq ft) forest in inner-city Milan. To boost its green credentials further, the tower will also receive an impressive 65 percent of its overall electricity requirements from solar panels and will be partially built using wood.

The existing Pirellino office tower already on the site is being renovated to improve its energy efficiency and boost its ability to withstand seismic activity. Originally built in 1950 for Pirelli, the 127-m (416-ft) tower is now in serious need of some work and hasn't actually been in use for a few years as it doesn't meet current EU regulations.

The old Pirellino office tower and the new greenery covered skyscraper will be connected by a greenery filled bridge
The old Pirellino office tower and the new greenery covered skyscraper will be connected by a greenery filled bridge

An attractive-looking bridge will join the two towers and will be used as an extension of Milan's Biblioteca degli Alberi (Library of Trees). It will be packed with greenery to showcase various plant species and will also host an events and exhibition space.

"This project will reinvigorate the iconic former Pirellino building, creating a new tower that mixes architecture and nature to create a green space that is open to the whole city," says Stefano Boeri. "In such a difficult period, this project relaunches the vision of a forward-looking Milan and bravely faces the great challenges of the climate crisis."

The overall project is slated for the LEED Platinum green building standard, though we've no word yet on when construction is expected to begin.

Stefano Boeri Architetti has previously designed several similar greenery covered buildings in its Vertical Forest series, including the Nanjing Vertical Forest and Bosco Verticale, while Diller Scofidio + Renfro has won praise for its superb work on New York City's High Line and its Shed, also in NYC.

Source: Stefano Boeri Architetti

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3 comments
3 comments
paul314
Who will be responsible for maintaining the trees once all this is built? Who will prune them so they don't drop branches? Something like this will look beautiful for the first few seasons, but then what?
buzzclick
Holy crap. Another pretentious architectural concept that claims to be forward thinking. 65% of its energy consumption from solar panels...where are they? 10,000sq m of forest equivalent...who quantified this standard? Is that a forest of hardwoods or dense one of mostly conifers? The renovated Pirellino building looks rather attractive with its crown, but this overgrown concept looks like a bad hair day that needs a good trim. It appears like the popularity of green facades is getting trendy just for the sake of seeming eco-conscious. So much of it is facetious and will be looked upon as "what were we thinking" in years to come.

Stefano Boeri: "I was trying to think about why architects are not used to talking about their failures – we prefer to hide, to remove our flubs, our fiascos, and our failures. Honestly, the reason we were able to do the Bosco Verticale was because we were able to learn from failures . . . and what I hope is that other attempts will learn from the mistakes we made with the Bosco Verticale." No kidding. Looks like he has another lesson to learn.

Just because it's green doesn't mean it's 'green'. The modern world seems to have a bumper crop of pretentious crap.
aki009
1950's construction building? I'm already putting out some sympathetic coughing thinking of the asbestos removal that's ahead for some poor souls.