Automotive

Bollinger expands into the commercial market with Deliver-E van

Bollinger expands into the com...
Bollinger's electric Deliver-E boasts a lower total cost of ownership than a diesel or gasoline delivery van
Bollinger's electric Deliver-E boasts a lower total cost of ownership than a diesel or gasoline delivery van
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Bollinger's electric Deliver-E boasts a lower total cost of ownership than a diesel or gasoline delivery van
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Bollinger's electric Deliver-E boasts a lower total cost of ownership than a diesel or gasoline delivery van
The Bollinger design team doesn't tend to linger on ornamentation
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The Bollinger design team doesn't tend to linger on ornamentation
Huge visibility out the big front window
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Huge visibility out the big front window
A big, practical, emissions-free van
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A big, practical, emissions-free van
Enormous cargo space is only interrupted by small wheel arches
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Enormous cargo space is only interrupted by small wheel arches
Bollinger claims the Deliver-E will have the lowest step-in height in its class
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Bollinger claims the Deliver-E will have the lowest step-in height in its class
Battery options extend to an enormous 210 kWh
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Battery options extend to an enormous 210 kWh
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Best known for its brutal, boxy, powerful electric off-roaders, Detroit's Bollinger has announced a slightly less brutal and boxy front-wheel-drive electric delivery van with a wide range of battery options, up to a massive 210 kWh.

The Deliver-E will be available in a range of sizes and wheelbase lengths, meeting class 2B, 3, 4 and 5 standards. Its floor will be just 18 inches (46 cm) off the ground, which Bollinger claims gives it the industry's lowest step-in height – as well as the ground clearance of a Lamborghini, by the looks of it.

It looks like a very uncomplicated vehicle, with motors up front, a giant flat-floored open space out back and minimal interior protrusions from the rear wheel arches to cut into its enormous cargo carrying space. Customers can spec these things with 70, 105, 140, 175 or 210 kWh worth of batteries. The Lucid Air sedan can allegedly pull 517 miles (832 km) out of a 130-kWh pack, for reference, so although the Deliver-E will be heavier and less aerodynamic, 240 kWh should give it a pretty epic range figure.

Enormous cargo space is only interrupted by small wheel arches
Enormous cargo space is only interrupted by small wheel arches

The van will offer universal charge ports allowing DC fast-charge rates up to 100 kW. It'll also have standard ABS, traction and stability control, and hydraulic steering and brakes.

And importantly for commercial and fleet buyers, Bollinger says it'll have a lower total cost of ownership than a diesel- or gasoline-powered van. We'd like to see the figures that's based on out of interest, but electrics certainly cost much less in fuel, require next to no maintenance and have fewer consumable parts, so it's eminently possible given a heavy use schedule.

Source: Bollinger

View gallery - 7 images
6 comments
PhilippeHolthuizen
Love it! But that rear overhang is going to be one hell of a curb scraper!
paul314
Last-mile delivery vehicles are pretty much the perfect case for electrics. You know almost exactly how far they're going to drive each day, and you can adjust routes as needed.
foxpup
I'm just thinking about all the neighborhoods this unit CANNOT visit because of that low clearance. They are going to have to raise it up to make it viable. Speed-bumps, driveways, snow, dips in the road...they all will cause problems with being so low set. (brings back unpleasant memories regarding the Tran-Am I used to have) ...must have been designed by a south Californian, expecting every road and the weather to be perfect all the time. These delivery vans need to get out and be useful in the real world, not just Disneyland. It's a weird error coming from Rivian because their pickups have none of these problems.
foxpup
If this unit had a "lift kit" it could ride high while being driven and lower when parked to make for easy loading. (kind of like riding a camel). Then they could have the best of both worlds but the lift would have to be fast so it doesn't annoy drivers. I'm not even sure it's possible to build a lift system that would be fast enough. Once the driver gets in the truck they want to go NOW, not 3 seconds form now. Still, if the truck rises while the driver puts on his seat-belt and such, it might work.
Mik Fielding
Have fun with the road humps in that van!!!

Do designers ever live in the real world!
Johannes
Check out the chariot-wheel-knives! What the heck are they? And what kind of interaction will they have with kerbs?