Automotive

EAV's electric delivery trucks can join together to form a "road train"

EAV's electric delivery trucks...
EAV's Lincs electric vehicle will have a range of around 100 miles
EAV's Lincs electric vehicle will have a range of around 100 miles
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A render of the front end of EAV's Lincs vehicle
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A render of the front end of EAV's Lincs vehicle
EAV hopes its Lincs electric vehicle can serve as a versatile cargo truck for a range of applications
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EAV hopes its Lincs electric vehicle can serve as a versatile cargo truck for a range of applications
EAV's Lincs electric vehicle will have a range of around 100 miles
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EAV's Lincs electric vehicle will have a range of around 100 miles
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Startup Electric Assist Vehicles (EAV) entered the electric mobility space back in 2019 with a pedal-assist quadracycle designed to carry out urban cargo deliveries, and soon added variants with tractor trailers and refrigeration modules followed by two-seat micro-taxi last year. The company is now expanding its family of electric vehicles even further, introducing a multipurpose cargo van that can be adapted for a range of tasks.

EAV's previous offerings have been designed as low-pollution solutions to congestion, looking to offer a way of moving goods and people around urban centers with a far smaller footprint than electric cars and trucks. The newly announced Lincs (Lightweight Inner-City Solution) is cut from the same cloth, aimed squarely at reducing our reliance on legacy vehicles in towns and cities.

EAV hopes its Lincs electric vehicle can serve as a versatile cargo truck for a range of applications
EAV hopes its Lincs electric vehicle can serve as a versatile cargo truck for a range of applications

The electric vehicle sits on an aluminum skateboard chassis and is driven by a pair of connected in-hub electric motors, powered by a removable lithium battery pack said to provide a range of up to 100 miles (160 km). The vehicle is claimed to be future-proofed for autonomous operations, and is designed to be multipurpose and adaptable to a range of applications.

"Lincs, in its logistics role, acts as a fully dynamic ‘hub-and-spoke’ mobile depot vehicle, delivering EAVRoRo boxes to EAV eCargo fleets in various different dynamic optimized locations such as forecourts or car parks," explains Adam Barmby, CEO and Founder of EAV. "This significantly reduces stem distances and increases operational efficiency within the last mile. Lincs will also be able to operate as a simple covered urban van or open pick-up or drop side."

A render of the front end of EAV's Lincs vehicle
A render of the front end of EAV's Lincs vehicle

EAv plans to produce the vehicle in both left- and right-hand drive variants, and interestingly, says multiple Lincs will be able to be joined together to form a single autonomous "Road train."

“Towns and cities are vitally important to future living.” says Barmby. “We have a duty to urban communities, to the businesses that operate within them providing jobs, commerce and opportunities for the future. Our duty is to provide an efficient commercial and passenger transport system that enhances the quality of life for everyone and everything within that community."

Source: EAV

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2 comments
2 comments
VadimR
It would be nice to have a one side cabin for a pickup to be able to carry large sheets of plywood, drywall, glass, etc on the side next to the cabin, or long pipes, lumber, etc.
ljaques
Pretty funky wheels, folks. I like it...as long as the cab doesn't contain rotating pedals like your other little vehicles. Modular will probably fit some niches, as airlines found decades ago.