Automotive

Bullet-like Pininfarina concept car reshapes electric driving

Bullet-like Pininfarina concep...
The Pininfarina Teorema appears ready to fire out a barrel
The Pininfarina Teorema appears ready to fire out a barrel
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Pininfarina Teorema design sketch
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Pininfarina Teorema design sketch
Pininfarina Teorema design sketch
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Pininfarina Teorema design sketch
The Teorema interior features a unique three-row layout
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The Teorema interior features a unique three-row layout
What the Teorema lacks in people-moving efficiency, it makes up for in roomy comfort
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What the Teorema lacks in people-moving efficiency, it makes up for in roomy comfort
The Teorema is envisioned with both autonomous and manual drive modes
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The Teorema is envisioned with both autonomous and manual drive modes
The rearmost seats look like they're designed to be the most comfortable
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The rearmost seats look like they're designed to be the most comfortable
The Teorema stretches out like a full-size SUV but stands just over 4.5 feet tall at 55 inches
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The Teorema stretches out like a full-size SUV but stands just over 4.5 feet tall at 55 inches
The Pininfarina Teorema appears ready to fire out a barrel
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The Pininfarina Teorema appears ready to fire out a barrel
The Teorema includes visible and concealed airflow elements for enhanced aero
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The Teorema includes visible and concealed airflow elements for enhanced aero
No performance specs are given for the Teorema, but it's much more a design study and exploration of new style and layout possibilities
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No performance specs are given for the Teorema, but it's much more a design study and exploration of new style and layout possibilities
The huge Kamm tail is sure to lend some aero efficiency to the Teorema design
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The huge Kamm tail is sure to lend some aero efficiency to the Teorema design
The Teorema has no shortage of ambient lighting
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The Teorema has no shortage of ambient lighting
Pininfarina worked with a number of partners, including Benteler (rolling e chassis) WayRay (augmented reality), Continental (Smart Glass and controls) and Poltrona Frau (seats)
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Pininfarina worked with a number of partners, including Benteler (rolling e chassis) WayRay (augmented reality), Continental (Smart Glass and controls) and Poltrona Frau (seats)
The Teorema ditches the side doors and features a rear walk-in entry
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The Teorema ditches the side doors and features a rear walk-in entry
The lighted floor adds some visibility for finding one's seat
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The lighted floor adds some visibility for finding one's seat
Augmented reality delivers both driving and POI info
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Augmented reality delivers both driving and POI info
Controls are integrated neatly into the structural and trim materials
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Controls are integrated neatly into the structural and trim materials
View gallery - 17 images

Given the lack of auto shows, it's been a rather slow year for envelope-pushing concept cars. But Pininfarina makes up for lost time with the all-new Teorema, reshaping automotive exterior and interior packaging for a more comfortable all-electric self-driving future. The VR-crafted concept car fills out its unique pod-like body with a convertible interior that's nearly as comfortable as a camper.

Too often we've seen auto companies rave about the creative possibilities invited by electric and self-driving technologies, only to end up churning out the same boring vehicle shapes and styles we've had for decades. If an empty under-hood, flat floor and lack of driver controls really free you to create something different, why not create something different? Why not build something that brings interior comfort and/or aerodynamics to extreme levels previously unseen in the industry?

The Teorema stretches out like a full-size SUV but stands just over 4.5 feet tall at 55 inches
The Teorema stretches out like a full-size SUV but stands just over 4.5 feet tall at 55 inches

That's the direction in which Pininfarina moves with the Teorema. The concept's smooth, rounded body looking more like the latest Hyperloop capsule than a traditional car. The exterior may draw the most attention, but it's the interior that lays the foundation for the entire concept. Starting with the key advantages of an all-electric platform — compact, decentralized powertrain and flat, open floor — Pininfarina designers in Cambiano and Shanghai worked to create a more home-like layout and ambiance inside before penning a body around it.

The Teorema experience begins just before entry, when a central panel in the glass canopy slides opens and the entire rear body shell swings up and forward, allowing occupants to walk aboard as if walking through the doorway of a house — much more natural than bobbing and weaving through a traditional car door and reminiscent of what Renault accomplished with the 2018 EZ-GO concept.

The Teorema ditches the side doors and features a rear walk-in entry
The Teorema ditches the side doors and features a rear walk-in entry

Each occupant walks to his or her seat, guided along by the swirl of lights integrated into the floor. The generously spaced seats create a full walking aisle down the center of the battery-top floor, while the slide-open glass canopy panel allows passengers to walk naturally without ever having to duck down.

The Teorema interior features a unique three-row layout
The Teorema interior features a unique three-row layout

At 212 inches (540 cm), the Teorema measures longer than a GMC Yukon, but Pininfarina avoids any temptation to stuff in seats and maximize occupancy, instead relying on a unique combination of single front seat and two rear rows each occupied by left and right seats. In addition to allowing for the aforementioned standing-height walk-in entry, the 1 + 2 + 2 layout leaves each occupant free to move around the vehicle or reposition.

The rear two rows of seats can combine and fold into two individual chaise lounges, providing an opportunity to kick back and relax or sit in a conference-style arrangement. When grabbing a nap, the Continental Smart glass tints around the rear cabin to enhance the restful atmosphere.

What the Teorema lacks in people-moving efficiency, it makes up for in roomy comfort
What the Teorema lacks in people-moving efficiency, it makes up for in roomy comfort

Individual drive modes correlate to different interior configurations. In full Level 5 autonomous mode, for instance, the driver is able to swivel around 180 degrees and interact freely with everyone else on board. In drive mode, the driver faces forward and uses the dual-joystick control system to operate the car while rear passengers remain engaged via the canopy glass-integrated WayRay augmented reality system providing both basic trip info and point-of-interest details. Passengers can use structure-integrated controls to pull up more details or share information.

Augmented reality delivers both driving and POI info
Augmented reality delivers both driving and POI info

In addition to a projectile-like shape and dramatic Kamm tail, the Teorema includes full-body venting to cut drag and improve aero performance. The front fender ducts direct air around the tires while longer side channels let it flow along the flanks and out the rear just inward of the tail lamps.

The Teorema was created entirely via virtual reality, but we have to think the Pininfarina team is absolutely itching to run that sleek, ducted body through the wind tunnel, so maybe a more tangible version will show up down the line.

Source: Pininfarina

View gallery - 17 images
13 comments
13 comments
VincentWolf
Simply put today's designers are so entrenched in 90's style aerodynamics that they have ruined the experience of electric cars for many.

There simply is no reason we can't return to the extravagant styles of the 1920's (model T style) or 1950's (with fins, etc) when making electric cars.

Everyone thought VW would follow through with it's VW Buzz to make a nice new EV based on it's 1950's Bug. But no, then they go and design another ugly SUV style vehicle instead.

No Thanks VW.
paleochocolate
Love the shape
paleochocolate
@VincentWolf Bruh, The ID Buzz is not an SUV.
David
It looks like an attempt to design an SUV by applying 21st century styling and materials to the Maserati Boomerang.
vince
Paleochoc: I said it looks like an SUV based on the spy photos of the production car which is shaped like a typical SUV and not the concept bus style shown to public. I didn't say it IS an SUV.
jerryd
In reality the windshield has such a bad angle you can't see through it.
jerryd
Vincent, aero doesn't have to be bad looking as most cars, SUVs today have a basically aero shape, they just screw them up with details.
There is a reason we don't return to those antiques, they take 2-3x the power, fuel to go 70mph is so obvious.
The Buzz wasn't designed after the bug, a sedan, but the microbus van and I agree they screwed it up royally but we'll see when we see the real front, not the disguise seen recently many think is.
What's interesting is your rant, the old microbus is actually aero and with minor clean up, very aero and a favorite to convert to an EV because it's light and aero. But VW refuses to build like that.
Don Duncan
Recently, a whistleblower has testified that the top EU legacy makers conspired for five years to avoid/delay eco vehicles as long as possible. These drawings will probably never be used. Innovation, progress, paradigm shifts come from new companies, if they can find a way around the political corruption the legacy makers have used against them getting started. Enterprise struggles to be free, as it is an expression of the best among us, to overcome the worst. Few can brave the politics.
Two are Tesla and Aptera. They represent our future, if we are to have one. The mainstream media (MSM) is not their friend. Ignorance and envy are easily manipulated by MSM to combat change.
WB
Typical pipe dream that any design 101 student can see as such. Too flat windshield unless they find some magic material won't work and the rear view is spectacular too..without mirrors and a back window ..so yeah nothing like creating some buzz with some pipe dreams
Pmeon
Why is it that every concept car has Bus sized wheels with low profile tyres as thick as a strip of masking tape with about 10mm of suspension travel. Top that off with a ground clearance that would have trouble getting over a pebble.
Then the car that is released looks nothing like the concept.