Bicycles

Fat-tired Aventure ebike is ready to throttle or assist on road or dirt

Fat-tired Aventure ebike is re...
Those funky 4-inch fat tires combine with a Zoom Forgo fork to smooth out the ride
Those funky 4-inch fat tires combine with a Zoom Forgo fork to smooth out the ride
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Those funky 4-inch fat tires combine with a Zoom Forgo fork to smooth out the ride
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Those funky 4-inch fat tires combine with a Zoom Forgo fork to smooth out the ride
Five levels of pedal assist are available to get you up to 28 mph, or throttle only can get you to 20 mph
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Five levels of pedal assist are available to get you up to 28 mph, or throttle only can get you to 20 mph
Real-world per-charge range is reported to average at 45 miles for Level-2 assist, or 27 miles in throttle only mode
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Real-world per-charge range is reported to average at 45 miles for Level-2 assist, or 27 miles in throttle only mode
The Aventure is available with a step-over (shown) or step-through frame
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The Aventure is available with a step-over (shown) or step-through frame
Front and rear cargo racks can be optioned in
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Front and rear cargo racks can be optioned in
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California's Aventon Bikes says that the recently launched Aventure is the most powerful and versatile ebike it's designed so far, equipped to pedal or throttle from road to beach to forest trails to mountain paths.

Powering the Aventure fat-tired ebike over road or dirt is a Bafang 750-W (1,130-W peak) rear hub motor, which can get you up to 20 mph (32 km/h) on throttle alone, or will provide five levels of assist up to 28 mph (45 km/h) if you put in some effort yourself. The removable 720-Wh Li-ion battery in the downtube is reckoned good for 27 miles (43.5 km) of real-world range on throttle or an average of 45 miles (72 km) per charge with pedal assist.

As you might expect, real-world motor-assist range does vary quite a bit – with that 45-mile average coming from the second pedal-assist level which tops out at 16 mph. Level one is reported to get you up to 53 miles at a more leisurely 11 mph, while pushing the ebike up to 28 mph at level five will see the per-charge range dip to 19 miles. Aventon says that it calculated those figures based on a 180-lb rider pedaling on a mostly flat terrain.

The ebike ships as a Class 2 ebike, but can be configured to a Class 3 ride via the backlit LCD color display, which also shows speed, battery status, pedal-assist level, and more. That display includes a USB port too, for keeping your smartphone charged when adventuring, and can sync with the Aventon app for storing rides, diving into stats and sharing adventures with friends.

Real-world per-charge range is reported to average at 45 miles for Level-2 assist, or 27 miles in throttle only mode
Real-world per-charge range is reported to average at 45 miles for Level-2 assist, or 27 miles in throttle only mode

The 6061 aluminum alloy frame is available in three sizes for the step-over model and two for the step-through variant, the Zoom Forgo fork with 80 mm of travel helps smooth out a bumpy ride, helped along by the four-inch Kenda Krusade fat tires with reflective sidewalls, the rider can shift between eight gears, stopping power comes from hydraulic disc braking with 180-mm rotors, and there's integrated lights front and back. Cargo racks are available as optional extras.

The Aventure weighs in a 73 lb (33 kg), but can accommodate up to 250 lb (113 kg) of rider weight and 55 lb (25 kg) of cargo, and comes supplied with front and rear fenders and a kickstand. It launched over the weekend and is available now for US$1,899. The video below has more.

This is AVENTURE | Aventon Bikes

Product page: Aventure via Electrek

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2 comments
2 comments
blucrab
can one that has vertigo operate it?
Daishi
If my rough math is close it means it takes 257 watts of power to go 16 mph (second level) and 1061 watts of power to go 28 mph (3rd level). I think those figures are probably accurate but the issue is level 2 hasn't really reached the point of diminishing returns and level 3 is too far into diminishing returns. They are drawing over 4x the power for a 75% increase in speed and I think they would benefit from a "level 2.5" setting. For context I draw about 450 watts at 22-25 MPH on a similarly specced fat tire bike and I significantly outweigh their test rider. That last 3-4 MPH isn't worth more than doubling the power draw and the sweet spot before DR seems to be in the low 20's.