Bicycles

Aventon launches Soltera to replace city driving with ebike riding

Aventon launches Soltera to re...
The Soltera comes with a step-over or step-through frame option, as a single-speed ebike or with a 7-speed derailleur, and riders can go throttle-only or pedal-assist
The Soltera comes with a step-over or step-through frame option, as a single-speed ebike or with a 7-speed derailleur, and riders can go throttle-only or pedal-assist
View 8 Images
The Soltera comes with a step-over or step-through frame option, as a single-speed ebike or with a 7-speed derailleur, and riders can go throttle-only or pedal-assist
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The Soltera comes with a step-over or step-through frame option, as a single-speed ebike or with a 7-speed derailleur, and riders can go throttle-only or pedal-assist
At 43 lb, the 7-speed Soltera model should be light enough to easily carry from the subway to the city street
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At 43 lb, the 7-speed Soltera model should be light enough to easily carry from the subway to the city street
The 350-W rear-hub motor offers pedal assist up to 20 mph, or throttle only to the same top speed
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The 350-W rear-hub motor offers pedal assist up to 20 mph, or throttle only to the same top speed
Soltera riders can check ebike metrics on the good-sized backlit LCD color display
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Soltera riders can check ebike metrics on the good-sized backlit LCD color display
The handlebar-mounted LCD display can be wirelessly connected to a smartphone running the Aventon app
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The handlebar-mounted LCD display can be wirelessly connected to a smartphone running the Aventon app
Riders will still need to step over a lowered top bar for the Soltera step-through variant
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Riders will still need to step over a lowered top bar for the Soltera step-through variant
Riders adopt a more aggressive, slightly forward stance for better control and stability
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Riders adopt a more aggressive, slightly forward stance for better control and stability
The Soltera comes as a single-speed ebike, or with a 7-speed derailleur
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The Soltera comes as a single-speed ebike, or with a 7-speed derailleur
View gallery - 8 images

California's Aventon wants you to leave your car at home and hop on the Soltera instead, which ships as a Class 3 ebike with both pedal assist and throttle only, can be had as a single-speed ride or with a 7-speed derailleur, and is available in step-over or step-through frame options.

Billed as "nimble and powerful enough to replace your car in the city yet lightweight enough to carry up a flight of stairs after a day’s work," the Soltera features a 350-W rear-hub motor for up to 20 mph (32 km/h) over five levels of pedal assist via cadence sensor. A thumb throttle is also available, to get you up to the same top speed without using your legs, but can be removed for riding in areas where throttles aren't allowed.

The ebike comes with a 36-V/10-Ah removable battery rocking LG cells that sits flush in the downtube, for an average of 41 miles (66 km) of per-charge range, though Aventon does offer some real-world test figures based on the 7-speed version.

The company reports that the test rider managed to achieve a per-charge range of 63 miles (101 km) with level 1 pedal-assist engaged (up to 6 mph), 25 miles (40 km) at level 3 (up to 14 mph), 22 miles (35 km) at level 5 (up to 20 mph) and 20 miles on throttle only.

At 43 lb, the 7-speed Soltera model should be light enough to easily carry from the subway to the city street
At 43 lb, the 7-speed Soltera model should be light enough to easily carry from the subway to the city street

Whether you opt for the step-over or step-through model, the 6061 aluminum alloy frame offers a slight forward riding stance for "greater control and stability as they navigate their commutes." At 41 lb (18.5 kg) for the single-speed or 43 lb (19.5 kg) for the 7-speed with Shimano RD-TY300D derailleur, it should be a relatively easy carry up the steps to the office building or the end-of-day haul up to the apartment.

The absence of suspension here means you'll feel any bumps that don't get soaked up by the aluminum rims wrapped in 700Cx35C Kenda K193 tires. Stopping power on the single-speed model comes from Tektro caliper brakes, while the 7-speed flavor gets Tektro M280 mechanical disc brakes with 160-mm rotors.

Elsewhere, there's IPX4 water resistance, frame-integrated lighting front and back, a backlit LCD color display that shows key ride and bike info, and can pair with the Aventon app for recording and sharing rides, adjusting settings and more, a Selle Royal saddle and included kickstand. None of the models are supplied with fenders or cargo racks, though such things can be optioned in.

The Soltera is available now, with the single-speed ebike priced at US$1,199 and the 7-speed costing a hundred bucks more. The video below has more.

Introducing the new SOLTERA.

Product page: Soltera

View gallery - 8 images
3 comments
3 comments
Chase
I wonder how Subaru feels about Aventon using a copyrighted name.
Pete0097
We built an e-bike back in the 70’s. Had a range of 50 miles, top speed of 45, and was built out of a Raleigh 3 speed English style bike, used a Ford starter motor and a big battery we had sitting around. Great fun.
Brian Smith
This is not really a class 3 e-bike as they are not allowed to have a throttle.
Strangely Class 2 e-bikes can have a throttle but are limited to a lower top speed. So many e-bike makers are creating bike like this that don't fit in any of the class 1, 2 or 3 categories. In the US this e-bike would likely legally be classified as a moped if it ever came to a court case. We really need the powers that be to come up with a class 4 e-bike category if they want non car based urban transport to become more popular. Or else we need to make it easer for people to legally ride e-ride bikes in the moped category as they currently require a separate license endorsement and vehicle registration and insurance in most states.