Bicycles

Faro takes a subtle approach to light-up helmets

Faro takes a subtle approach t...
The Faro bike helmet is presently on Kickstarter
The Faro bike helmet is presently on Kickstarter
View 3 Images
The Faro bike helmet is presently on Kickstarter
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The Faro bike helmet is presently on Kickstarter
The Faro helmet tips the scales at a claimed 480 g (size medium), is IPX6 waterproof (it can resist high-pressure spraying), and should be able to run its lights for up to 10 hours per 3-hour USB charge of its 1,850-mAh lithium-ion battery
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The Faro helmet tips the scales at a claimed 480 g (size medium), is IPX6 waterproof (it can resist high-pressure spraying), and should be able to run its lights for up to 10 hours per 3-hour USB charge of its 1,850-mAh lithium-ion battery
The Faro helmet can be set to different flashing patterns
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The Faro helmet can be set to different flashing patterns
View gallery - 3 images

We've seen a few different head- and tail-light-equipped bike helmets over the past several years, and some of the things have looked pretty … flashy. The Faro is a bit different, though, in that it has a classier, more refined appearance.

Designed by American startup Unit 1, the Faro features a narrow strip of 15 white LEDs in front, a strip of 15 red LEDs in the back, along with a grid of 40 RGB LEDs below the latter. The grid is covered by black mesh "tear-proof" fabric, so it's more or less hidden when it isn't illuminated.

An iOS/Android app is utilized to set the lights to different flashing patterns. If an optional Bluetooth handlebar-mounted remote is used, the rear LED grid also functions as a turn indicator – with the LEDs sequentially illuminating in the direction of the turn – or as a brake light.

The Faro helmet can be set to different flashing patterns
The Faro helmet can be set to different flashing patterns

Like Specialized's ANGi line of helmets, the Faro is additionally capable of detecting the sudden impacts associated with accidents. When it does, it triggers the app to ask the rider if they're alright. If there's no response within a given amount of time, the app then proceeds to send an SOS message to a predetermined emergency contact. That message includes the cyclist's current location.

Safety-conscious riders will also be interested in knowing that an upgraded version of the helmet features MiPS technology, which has been shown to reduce the likelihood of rotational brain injuries in collisions.

The whole thing tips the scales at a claimed 480 g (size medium), is IPX6 waterproof (it can resist high-pressure spraying), and should be able to run its lights for up to 10 hours per 3-hour USB charge of its 1,850-mAh lithium-ion battery.

It's currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where a pledge of US$129 will get you a basic non-MiPS Faro – assuming it reaches production, that is. The turn indicator remote is an additional $29, with the planned retail price of the helmet sitting at $189.

You can see it in use, in the video below.

Sources: Kickstarter, Unit 1

FARO by UNIT 1: A Sleek, Visibility-First Smart Helmet

View gallery - 3 images
5 comments
Tristan P
Yeah... "make you look good.." ... nah. Maybe if you're into Star Wars. Very practical idea though - especially the magnetic clasp - so hats off for that (pun intended).
alexD
can we get out of this nonsense "connect through an app" ? i just want to ride and at most, press a button; I dont want to be fumbling with yet another app for helmet.
BlueOak
Nicely done. Why aren’t cleanly designed helmets with integrated lighting commonly available?

Doing so might encourage more folks to wear helmets, improving safety.

These features should be doable by volume producers at reasonable prices. Mainstream helmet producers sitting on their arses.
Levi Switzer
Nice! Is there any plans on creating helmets for Motorcyclists and especially their passengers? Is this helmet DOT compliant? I have a grandson who is starting out riding a Honda Ruckus Scooter and a helmet like this would be perfect!
Trylon
Doesn't look any more understated than Lumos's Street or Matrix models, although it is certainly less expensive.