Bicycles

Folding-wheel Tuck Bike heads into production

Folding-wheel Tuck Bike heads ...
In its Full Monty fold mode – in which both the frame and the wheels are folded – the Tuck Bike measures just 26 x 16 x 34 inches (65 x 40 x 86 cm)
In its Full Monty fold mode – in which both the frame and the wheels are folded – the Tuck Bike measures just 26 x 16 x 34 inches (65 x 40 x 86 cm)
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In the Curtsy fold mode, the Tuck Bike's handlebar and pedals are folded in to make it narrow
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In the Curtsy fold mode, the Tuck Bike's handlebar and pedals are folded in to make it narrow
In the Quickie fold mode, the Tuck Bike's frame is folded in half
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In the Quickie fold mode, the Tuck Bike's frame is folded in half
The Tuck Bike's 28-inch wheels feature carbon fiber tubes instead of spokes, and they're said to meet the ISO 4210-7:2014 international standard for reliability
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The Tuck Bike's 28-inch wheels feature carbon fiber tubes instead of spokes, and they're said to meet the ISO 4210-7:2014 international standard for reliability
In its Full Monty fold mode – in which both the frame and the wheels are folded – the Tuck Bike measures just 26 x 16 x 34 inches (65 x 40 x 86 cm)
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In its Full Monty fold mode – in which both the frame and the wheels are folded – the Tuck Bike measures just 26 x 16 x 34 inches (65 x 40 x 86 cm)
View gallery - 4 images

Last year we told you about the prototype Tuck Bike, which featured both a folding frame and folding full-size 700c wheels. Well, you may soon be able to own one, as it's the subject of a just-launched Kickstarter campaign.

The single-speed Tuck Bike was created by California-based chartered mechanical engineer Alex Animashaun, who previously helped develop hybrid cars for Jaguar Land Rover in London. Both the original and the production version can reportedly be folded or unfolded in under two minutes – and that includes the wheels, which feature airless foam tires. Once folded, the bike can be pulled along on an integrated set of caster wheels.

Circling back to the wheel-folding thing, though … just how does that work?

"Imagine you have a pizza in front of you, cut in three slices," Animashaun previously told us. "The Tuck Bike wheel folds by lifting one piece, twisting it around and stacking it on the other. Do that again and you three slices stacked together. The wheel is locked at each rim joint and at the hub. The rim joints have a clamp that you slide in and out of place then tighten. The hub has a simple clamp."

The Tuck Bike's 28-inch wheels feature carbon fiber tubes instead of spokes, and they're said to meet the ISO 4210-7:2014 international standard for reliability
The Tuck Bike's 28-inch wheels feature carbon fiber tubes instead of spokes, and they're said to meet the ISO 4210-7:2014 international standard for reliability

The production model can actually be folded in one of three ways, depending on how compact you need it to be.

If you're storing it in a hallway and just need it to be narrow, the two sides of its flat handlebar and its pedals can simply be folded in. If it needs to be narrow and short, its frame can additionally be folded in the middle, so the front and rear wheels end up side-by-side. And finally, if you need it to be as small as possible (such as when it's being transported in the trunk of a car), the bars, pedals, frame and wheels can all be folded down.

Some of the Tuck Bike's more conventional features include a hydroformed 6061 T6 aluminum frame (the prototype was steel), Tektro Aries mechanical disc brakes, and a WTB Comfort ProGel saddle. Animashaun tells us that some of the other improvements over the original include faster-working frame hinges with magnetic closures, better-handling Gecko Rubber puncture-proof tires, and larger, easier-rolling caster wheels. The whole thing is claimed to tip the scales at 30 lb (13.6 kg) for a medium-size frame.

If you'd like a Tuck Bike of your own, a Kickstarter pledge of US$1,695 is required – the planned retail price is $1,995. Assuming it reaches production, it should ship next October. You can see it in wheel-folding action, in the video below.

Tuck Bike - The BIG bike for small spaces

Sources: Kickstarter, Tuck Bike

View gallery - 4 images
2 comments
2 comments
Jay Gatto
Good presentation! Looks like it has great potential (if only the seat tube geometry was towards my personal 'standard', 63°), it's all down to the wheels, and how they handle on the street, trail, tour. Could they be offered as aftermarket perhaps?
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Great for stowing on boats and RVs