Bicycles

Juiced HyperScrambler 2 ebike doubles up on batteries for a huge range

Juiced HyperScrambler 2 ebike ...
Two giant battery packs give the HyperScrambler 2 twice the range of most long-range ebikes
Two giant battery packs give the HyperScrambler 2 twice the range of most long-range ebikes
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Two giant battery packs give the HyperScrambler 2 twice the range of most long-range ebikes
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Two giant battery packs give the HyperScrambler 2 twice the range of most long-range ebikes
Twice as much battery as most long-range ebikes
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Twice as much battery as most long-range ebikes
Puncture-resistant scooter tires
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Puncture-resistant scooter tires
Brake lights, indicators and a license plate holder if you want to go legit
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Brake lights, indicators and a license plate holder if you want to go legit
Left switchgear, including a USB charge port
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Left switchgear, including a USB charge port
Juiced has co-developed an electric hub motor with Bafang. Continuous power is 1,000 W, but it can peak as high as 2,000 W
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Juiced has co-developed an electric hub motor with Bafang. Continuous power is 1,000 W, but it can peak as high as 2,000 W
Motorcycle style handlebars with mirrors and a small dash
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Motorcycle style handlebars with mirrors and a small dash
LCD dash is very basic
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LCD dash is very basic
It's dual suspension, but you're not going to be throwing it down a downhill run!
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It's dual suspension, but you're not going to be throwing it down a downhill run!
Hundred-mile range and 30-plus mph top speeds
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Hundred-mile range and 30-plus mph top speeds
The HyperScramblers are on pre-sale from late September at a significant discount from retail
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The HyperScramblers are on pre-sale from late September at a significant discount from retail
View gallery - 11 images

Juiced has unleashed another high-powered ebike/e-moped/electric motorcycle, this time taking aim at range anxiety with not one, but two 52-volt, 19.2-Ah batteries. The HyperScrambler 2 can beat 100 miles (160 km) easily and reach speeds over 30 mph (48 km/h).

In order to run a two-battery bike, Juiced has developed a controller system that intelligently balances the load on both batteries at once, taking into account each pack's charge level. Both batteries also charge together, and with fast charger accessories you can get from 0-80 percent in around two hours.

The HyperScrambler runs dual suspension, with a twin-shock back and and full-length forks at the front. Like the HyperScorpion, it runs puncture-resistant scooter tires, with a powerful motor built into the rear wheel. Co-designed with Bafang, this motor puts out a continuous 1,000 W, and can peak up to 2,000 W, responding either to a twist throttle or to pedal torque and cadence sensors in the crank.

Juiced has co-developed an electric hub motor with Bafang. Continuous power is 1,000 W, but it can peak as high as 2,000 W
Juiced has co-developed an electric hub motor with Bafang. Continuous power is 1,000 W, but it can peak as high as 2,000 W

Furthering the comparisons to a motorcycle (which it is, by any legal definition, in many parts of the world), it's got a big ol' LED headlight with daytime running lights, brake lights, indicators and a license plate holder. The seat's a good meaty padded bench, looking very perineum-friendly in comparison to a bicycle saddle, but the height is non-adjustable. No matter, with the amount of juice this thing can store, you don't need to be optimizing your pedal stroke anyway.

The HyperScrambler 2 will be taking pre-orders from September 23, with deliveries starting in November. The dual-battery bike will pre-sell at US$2,999, a hefty discount from the eventual retail price of US$3,999. You can get a single-battery version with half the range for US$2,499, which will become US$2,999 once stock's in and bikes are available immediately.

Check out a video below.

Juiced Bikes HyperScrambler 2 - dual battery high-power ebike

Source: Juiced Bikes

View gallery - 11 images
11 comments
paul314
These kinds of things shouldn't really be called e-bikes. They're more like e-mopeds. (emo ped?)
Mzungu_Mkubwa
Would be cool if they had a switch would would take the battery packs from parallel to serial and back. Then you could go between range and power/performance at the flip of a switch. (Not sure if this is feasible, but just thot it'd be cool when I saw dual batteries.)
guzmanchinky
Very cool, but where is it legal? Certainly not on any bike path in the US, maybe off road? Will it be fully street legal in the US?
Fairly Reasoner
That seat will scramble ‘em for ya, alright.
bhtooefr
So the legality is questionable - they ship it in a mode that behaves like a class 2 e-bike (20 MPH throttle) by default, with the ability to set it to class 1 (20 MPH pedal assist), class 3 (28 MPH pedal assist), or "race track" (no speed limiter and throttle).

However, I'm pretty sure that such a bike that explicitly allows the rider to change modes after it's manufactured doesn't actually fit into the class system legally. And, because it's capable of more than 20 MPH under throttle, it may not be legal to sell as an electric bicycle under Consumer Product Safety Commission regulation.

...but it actually looks like it might have enough that if they issue a certificate of origin and a VIN, it may be registerable as a motorcycle.
wolf0579
Needs a higher top speed to go faster than a pissed-off adult Sasquatch can run if it's for trail use.
Daishi
Many manufacturers have software assist settings that loosely map to vehicle classes. In modes ECO, 1, and 2 it's the same as any other trail legal ebike in most places. Officially it's a class 3 ebike which are not technically legal on most bike trails so even if you are in one of the legal settings you could maybe get fined if the police are being jerks and hold you to the official class of the bike. I ride a class 3 fat tire mountain bike on trails that are restricted to class 2 ebikes in ECO mode all the time. I've never gotten in trouble and I'd argue with any police officer that tried to ticket me traveling within the speed limit because to me it's the same thing as owning a Corvette and driving it the speed limit. "Sir. I pulled you over going the speed limit because I googled this car and it says it's capable of 160 MPH". But yes if you use it in the unlocked (Sport) mode that goes over 28 MPH it's legally a moped and has the same restrictions as one (private property or the side of the road generally). I used ECO mode because I ride 30-40 miles at a time and Sport mode would probably drain my one battery in half that. Also, with 2 batteries this thing is 52V and 38.4Ah which is one of the highest I know of in the industry. It's about twice as much as the Eric Buell Fuell bike that uses 2 batteries because they are about twice the capacity. I'm actually hoping Juiced builds a 2 battery fat tire mountain bike a the future version with the same technology because they would be popular with the bike-packing crowd. My experience with my old Scrambler is that it's harder to put in human power than a regular mountain bike so you tend to rely on the battery for more of the work to keep up to my other ebikes. With 3 ebikes using the same battery the scrambler was always a little lower when we got where we were going because it needs a higher assist setting to match ECO on the other (Juiced HF1000) bikes.
guzmanchinky
I wonder if at some point we will also run into a legality issue with weight. People argue e-bikes should be illegal in part because the bike weighs so much more than a normal bicycle, and unlike the human rider, doesn't deform when it impacts someone else.
notarichman
scrambler? the name suggests on/off road if not trail riding...but look at the tires. i'm not used to seeing tires that won't handle gravel, mud, snow.
Daishi
@guzmanchinky of all the reasons I see to complain that ebikes should be Illegal complaining that regular bicycles deform easier when striking people has to be one of the worst so far. This same difference exists between ultralight carbon fiber road bikes and mountain bikes too but I have yet to see someone make this argument for outlawing mountain bikes. I know tons of people that lost their lives or got seriously injured for tons of different reasons but I've never even head of anyone getting seriously injured by someone else on a bicycle and I think efforts to make bicycles intentionally flimsy for this reason are more likely to just result to injury to the rider when they break under normal riding hitting potholes, bumps etc. You would probably need to get hit by 50 bicycles all going 20 MPH at exactly the same time to equal the force of an SUV going 5 MPH and even that has more to do with the weight of the rider than the bicycle. Besides, ebikes get about 1,400 MPGe making them essentially the most efficient form of transportation on the planet.