Bicycles

Juiced Hyperscorpion ebike gets cheekily close to motorcycle territory

Juiced Hyperscorpion ebike get...
The Hyperscorpion: blurring the line between ebike and moped
The Hyperscorpion: blurring the line between ebike and moped
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Chunky rear rack, plus motorcycle-style brake lights, indicators and a license plate holder
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Chunky rear rack, plus motorcycle-style brake lights, indicators and a license plate holder
Custom wheel design places a chunky 1,000W Bafang motor at the center of a cast metal hub with puncture-resistant motorcycle-style tires
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Custom wheel design places a chunky 1,000W Bafang motor at the center of a cast metal hub with puncture-resistant motorcycle-style tires
Big mirrors and motorcycle-style hand controls
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Big mirrors and motorcycle-style hand controls
Diminutive dash tells you everything you need to know
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Diminutive dash tells you everything you need to know
A 2,000-lumen, 4-globe headlight setup. It's even got daytime driving lights
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A 2,000-lumen, 4-globe headlight setup. It's even got daytime driving lights
The Hyperscorpion comes in blue, black or brushed aluminum
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The Hyperscorpion comes in blue, black or brushed aluminum
All three color options
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All three color options
Beefy battery holds a kilowatt-hour of energy for serious 70-mile range figures
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Beefy battery holds a kilowatt-hour of energy for serious 70-mile range figures
The Hyperscorpion: blurring the line between ebike and moped
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The Hyperscorpion: blurring the line between ebike and moped
View gallery - 9 images

One of the most interesting and exciting segments of the emerging ebike market is the rapidly blurring border between ebikes and mopeds. These are not waters swum by passionate cyclists; these things are for practically-minded commuter types interested in genuine car replacement options.

The Juiced Hyperscorpion is a particularly beastly version of the Scorpion released in 2019, and it's as close to a motorcycle as anything we've seen. It's got suspension forks, hydraulic disc brakes, a preload-adjustable twin shock back end, a moped seat, headlight, tail light, 1A USB charge port, horn, mirrors, indicators, fenders and even a license plate holder. The tires are 20-inch puncture resistant jobs, 4 inches wide and looking every bit the part of scooter tires on their cast rims. There's a twist throttle, in case you were in any doubt, and the damn thing even runs cruise control.

It's less motorcycle-like at the motor, where you'll find a 1 kW Bafang rear hub unit, and it still has the accoutrements of a bicycle in the form of an 8-speed Shimano Altus gearset and a pair of pedals. Having now owned a mid-drive ebike for a couple of years and chewed through three chains and one rear cassette, hub drives are looking a lot more attractive to me these days, simply for the strain a mid-drive places on a flimsy bicycle drivetrain.

Chunky rear rack, plus motorcycle-style brake lights, indicators and a license plate holder
Chunky rear rack, plus motorcycle-style brake lights, indicators and a license plate holder

The battery is a big, juicy kilowatt-hour unit, running at 52 V with a 19.2 Ah capacity and offering ranges up to and above 70 miles (112 km) depending on how it's ridden. In addition to the twist throttle, the Hyperscorpion has both high-fidelity cadence and torque sensors to determine how fast and hard you're pedaling, to add electric assist. It's capable of speeds up to 30 mph (~50 km/h) on the throttle alone, although this is only for "off road" usage.

Indeed, in many parts of the world it's not legal for on road usage at all; hence, perhaps, the license plate holder, which would allow it to run as a moped in certain jurisdictions. Using the dash, you can reasonably easily switch between class 2, class 3 and unrestricted "race" mode depending on where you're riding it.

In terms of what's missing, very little really. I'd like to see some built-in locking systems, perhaps a motorcycle-style steering lock and either a key or perhaps even a fingerprint sensor or PIN to unlock and turn on the bike. An adjustable-height seat would be handy; you can get a seat riser accessory but it'd be better if you could pop the seat up and down if sharing it around with the family.

Big mirrors and motorcycle-style hand controls
Big mirrors and motorcycle-style hand controls

I think Juiced could take a page out of the RadRunner's book with this one and offer more custom-designed accessories like boxes, bags, kid seats, waterproof lockable containers and the like. At the moment, the accessory catalog is pretty thin. But the basic platform here is much, much sturdier, more fully featured and specced out. It's a pizza with the lot.

If you ask me, this is the kind of vehicle governments need to start finding ways to encourage instead of restrict: clean, quiet, sturdy and quick, with a big rear rack for carrying things up to and including passengers (with an extra seat option). Machines like these will take cars off roads, reducing congestion and throwing significant health and wellness benefits into the pot, and that's good for everyone.

The Juiced Hyperscorpion is on sale now at US$2,899, with deliveries beginning in August. Video below.

Juiced HyperScorpion - A Closer Look

Source: Juiced Bikes

View gallery - 9 images
10 comments
Rustgecko
In the EU or UK this would be legally a motorbike.
Brian M
"kind of vehicle governments need to start finding ways to encourage instead of restrict: clean, quiet, sturdy and quick"
Absolutely, its not the technology here that is the issue but restrictive (and stupid) government policies in the EU and UK etc. A cynical person could be forgiven for concluding this is more about losing tax revenue from cars etc. than being green!
nick101
I live in a city with dedicated bike-lanes which are already swarming with hacked Chinese e-bikes doing 60 kph. These things will have to have some kind of insurance and regulations soon, it's coming . . .
jerryd
Great article and just what we need is this kind of robust hopefully light low cost transport to replace cars.
I'd add a trailer hitch point at axle level to make it better for shopping, carrying the kiddies, etc.
It could use a cheaper price but hopefully that will come from higher production.
And the hodgepod laws need to change to uniform less restrictive ones other than the 30mph speed.
BlueOak
Cool bike, albeit at a stiff price. Watch the incredibly detailed video. This guy knows how to sell his bike. Aside from affordability, my remaining concern about using these bikes to replace cars, where you leave them parked unattended, is theft.
BlueOak
“Having now owned a mid-drive ebike for a couple of years and chewed through three chains and one rear cassette, hub drives are looking a lot more attractive to me these days, simply for the strain a mid-drive places on a flimsy bicycle drivetrain.”

This seems to be a smart real world requirement for folks who will actually *use* the bike rather than letting it sit, bracing up the garage sidewall for months at a time. I kid you not, a neighbor let us try out his very nice eBikes and we were impressed. When we asked why he got them, he responded “so my wife and I can go to get ice cream cones without taking the car!l !?!
Trylon
Might as well leave off the pedals and crankset. The seat is too low and there's no way to adjust the height. It's impossible to pedal it at any decent speed or any kind of distance. It's a small motorcycle and those things are nothing but a way to squeeze it within the law. It's no different from "e-bikes" like the Super73, which now advertises itself as an "electric motorbike." I certainly wouldn't buy one because I like to pedal.
Worzel
If it has a motor, and pedals, then its a 'mo-ped' regardless of what else it has. In France 14 year-olds can ride mopeds, also small cars, not above 50cc, 30mph/50k max, no licence needed. In the UK not till 16 and then a licence is required, and a test within 2 years.
This machine has the essentials that anything used in normal traffic needs, especially effective rear view mirrors. There are a few maimed, or dead cyclists in the world, or not, that decided to turn without checking behind first.
The suspension should make it attractive to those with back problems, that a lack of would cause pains. Also it keeps the wheels in contact with the road surface and so maximises energy use.
I think the chain could do with some protection, to keep dirt, and more importantly, clothing out of it.
The only down point is the price. 14 and 16 year olds are unlikely to have the cash for this, and if the 'Mum and Dad' bank is closed, then No Sale.
To achieve success, quantity production is a necessity, to achieve that, maximum market. So, the price needs to be adjusted, down.
Another thought, is that as this machine is capable of moped speeds, then appropriate protective clothing would be advisable, especially knee and elbow protection, in case of a fall.
Jerome Morley Larson Sr eAIA
Is there a rain shield in the works?
Daishi
@nick101 Regulations already exist based on the class of vehicle. Most municipalities and governments have already defined which classes of ebikes can be permitted in most places. The settings on the computer for it are based on the ebike class. Taking an ebike that's capable of class 3 or "unrestricted" and adjusting it to class 1 or 2 setting on a bike trail is really no different than driving a Corvette in a 35 MPH zone within the speed limit. Going 60 kph on a bike trail is illegal, after 28 MPH and 4 kph it's legally a moped and has to comply with the same restrictions as mopeds but even mopeds are generally driven on the side of the road rather than holding a middle lane position with traffic like a motorcycle in most of the world.


@Trylon & Worzel
In most cases in the US class 1 and 2 ebikes are legally bicles rather than motor vehicles and permitted in most places that bicycles are permitted. It's not a loophole most municipalities have specific legislation for ebikes that state that class 1 and 2 bikes are not considered motor vehicles. As for the "Might as well leave off the pedals and crankset" comment I think you misunderstand that these are generally not ridden at top speed and they are usually limited to 20 MPH in throttle only mode. There is a massive difference in the range you will get based on the speed you are traveling. Bicycles are not aerodynamic which is why people that often power them manually wear speedos. Over any significant distance they are in ECO, class 1, or class 2 (legal for bicycle trails) or the battery won't last because of diminishing returns (even though it's huge). The Scorpion seat is sort of adjustable with the lift but your point is definitely valid for the Juiced Scrambler. I have a couple ebikes and sold my Scrambler because the seating position was too challenging to pedal and it couldn't keep up with my other (HyperFat) ebikes on normal rides without using a LOT more electric assist. The scorpion is better suited for pedaling than the Scrambler but unless you know what you are doing or have strong reasons (like needing rear view mirrors and turn signals) I still recommend getting an ebike that's designed like a bicycle because you still do work and that's kind of the point.


@BlueOak I park my motorcycle outside and take my ebike inside. My ebike (Hyperfat, same as the RipCurrent) is 70 lbs and I currently push it up 2 flights of stairs to put it inside but it has a "walk mode" where I hold down the down button on the computer and it goes 1 MPH with me next to it so it does some of the work going up the stairs. The Scorpion is 100 lbs and I'm sure I could bring it up stairs with the same method but a child or small woman might not be able to do it. If I couldn't rely on the bike to do some of the work it would be a lot harder to bring it up stairs. I live in a nice area (in Colorado) where the people around me are mostly decent but if I left it outside with a bike lock I'd probably worry about it.