Bicycles

Pivot loads up Shuttle v2 eMTB with EP8 motor and huge battery

Pivot loads up Shuttle v2 eMTB...
The Shuttle v2 offers Eco, Trail and Boost assist modes, with the motor providing pedal assistance up to 20 mph
The Shuttle v2 offers Eco, Trail and Boost assist modes, with the motor providing pedal assistance up to 20 mph
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The Shuttle v2 rocks an "aggressive geometry for no holds barred enduro performance"
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The Shuttle v2 rocks an "aggressive geometry for no holds barred enduro performance"
The rear DW-Link suspension with Fox DPX2 shock offers 140 mm of travel
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The rear DW-Link suspension with Fox DPX2 shock offers 140 mm of travel
The Shimano EP8 motor is lighter and more powerful than its predecessor
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The Shimano EP8 motor is lighter and more powerful than its predecessor
The battery can be swapped out by simply removing two bolts
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The battery can be swapped out by simply removing two bolts
The Shuttle v2 offers Eco, Trail and Boost assist modes, with the motor providing pedal assistance up to 20 mph
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The Shuttle v2 offers Eco, Trail and Boost assist modes, with the motor providing pedal assistance up to 20 mph
The huge 726-Wh battery could see an average-weight rider out on the mountain trails for up to four hours per charge
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The huge 726-Wh battery could see an average-weight rider out on the mountain trails for up to four hours per charge
Pivot says that the Shuttle v2 eMTB has "the power to take you where you dream of going, and give you the ride of your life getting there and back"
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Pivot says that the Shuttle v2 eMTB has "the power to take you where you dream of going, and give you the ride of your life getting there and back"
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Arizona mountain bike maker Pivot Cycles has announced an update to 2017's Shuttle eMTB, which comes with a lighter, more efficient motor and a big battery for the promise of "class leading power, range, and big mountain capability."

Coming in a green color option only, the carbon fiber frame looks to be about the same as the first generation ride, but has been treated to some geometry modifications to offer what Pivot describes as "no holds barred enduro performance." And like before, the frame comes in four sizes to accommodate riders from 5.25 ft to 6.5 ft (1.6 - 2 m) in height.

The DW-Link rear suspension looks unchanged too, allowing for 140 mm of travel, but is paired with a Fox 38 fork with 160 mm of travel, for "best in class eMTB steering precision and performance."

The big updates come to the eMTB's motor and battery. Pivot has treated version two to a new Shimano EP8 motor – or Steps DU-EP800, to use its given name – which is reported some 380 grams (13.4 oz) lighter than the Steps system that powered the original Shuttle. It offers 21 percent more power than its predecessor too, at 85 Nm (63 lb.ft) of torque, and provides assist up to 20 mph (32 km/h).

Pivot says that the Shuttle v2 eMTB has "the power to take you where you dream of going, and give you the ride of your life getting there and back"
Pivot says that the Shuttle v2 eMTB has "the power to take you where you dream of going, and give you the ride of your life getting there and back"

Where version one of the Shuttle eMTB came with a 504-Wh battery, the new model comes with a generous 726-Wh unit that's removed from the frame using a new two-bolt release system. The charging port has been moved up to near the head tube for convenience, on the opposite side to the power button.

Range estimates vary according to assist mode, but Pivot reckons that an average rider could get up to four hours per charge in a mix of Eco, the newly optimized Trail (which features assist ratio algorithms that varies the assist dependent on the ride) and Boost modes. Should you want to carry a spare, a second 726-Wh battery will cost you an extra thousand bucks, but the Shuttle can accommodate 635-Wh and 508-Wh units too.

Elsewhere, the new Shuttle rides on 29-inch wheels wrapped in Maxxis tires and there's more Shimano – a 12-speed derailleur and shifter, XTR four-piston brakes and rotors, crankset, cassette and chain. Phoenix carbon handlebar, stem and grips, and a proprietary saddle complete the given specs.

The new Shuttle eMTB is on sale now for US$10,099.

Product page: Shuttle v2

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3 comments
3 comments
Signguy
Why are these bikes so outrageously expensive? $10 K for a BIKE?! Phhht!
Daishi
The battery is an upgrade from the last version but it's not huge 726-Wh is pretty common. The Rad powered bikes is the biggest budget ebike maker on the market and their $1500 bikes come with a 48v, 14Ah battery which is 672 Wh. The $2,000 bikes from Juiced use a 52v 19.2Ah battery for 998 Wh. Rad assists to 20mph (level 2) and Juiced will assist to 28 (level 3). Some of these expensive bike brands package better bicycle components but they don't really seem to be leading over much cheaper brands with the ebike portion of the specs.
ljaques
Outstanding! You get ugly matched to outrageous overpricing of "only" ELEVEN GRAND! For that price, you could have a Zero FX which is licensed for the street, too. Nah, I'm happier with my lower performing sub $300 DIY mountain bike, thanks.