Digital Cameras

Fujifilm X-Pro3 encourages photographers to use the viewfinder

Fujifilm X-Pro3 encourages pho...
Fujifilm hides the LCD monitor to encourage photographers to take a traditional through-the-viewfinder approach to framing a shot
Fujifilm hides the LCD monitor to encourage photographers to take a traditional through-the-viewfinder approach to framing a shot
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The tilting LCD monitor is closed by default, but users can check settings on the little Memory LCD
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The tilting LCD monitor is closed by default, but users can check settings on the little Memory LCD
The X-Pro3 is constructed using magnesium alloy and titanium
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The X-Pro3 is constructed using magnesium alloy and titanium
The X-Pro3 features a 26.1 megapixel X-Trans APS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)CMOS sensor and X-Processor 4 image processor
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The X-Pro3 features a 26.1 megapixel X-Trans APS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)CMOS sensor and X-Processor 4 image processor
Fujifilm hides the LCD monitor to encourage photographers to take a traditional through-the-viewfinder approach to framing a shot
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Fujifilm hides the LCD monitor to encourage photographers to take a traditional through-the-viewfinder approach to framing a shot

Before the camera world went digital, framing a shot was undertaken through a viewfinder. Even though many still bring their eye up to the camera, others make use of a live view monitor around back to preview a scene or one that's touch-enabled to frame up and take the photo. The latest X-series flagship from Fujifilm has been designed to reconnect photographers with the viewfinder.

Fujifilm last updated its X-Pro retro-styled mirrorless camera in 2016, and the successor retains the same overall aesthetic but there are a few changes of note. Instead of an all magnesium alloy chassis, Fujifilm has opted to mix things up with a magnesium alloy interior and titanium exterior for the X-Pro3. The new body has been weather-sealed at 70 points.

In pursuit of what it calls "Pure Photography," Fujifilm has made a couple of changes to the advanced hybrid viewfinder that debuted in the X-Pro2. This setup allows the photographer to switch between optical and electronic modes, with the latter now making use of a 3.69-million-dot organic electroluminescent (OLED) panel. Where the optical mode allows the user to see a subject as is, the electronic mode caters for checking settings while shooting too.

The tilting LCD monitor is closed by default, but users can check settings on the little Memory LCD
The tilting LCD monitor is closed by default, but users can check settings on the little Memory LCD

Around back you'll find a 3-inch, 1.62-million-dot tilting LCD monitor with a difference. It comes closed by default, where a 1.28-inch Memory LCD display shows camera settings info whether the camera is powered on or not. Rather than offering a vari-angle panel, Fujifilm has installed one that can only be tilted down by 180 degrees.

Elsewhere, the X-Pro3 features a back-illuminated 26.1 megapixel X-Trans APS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm) CMOS sensor and X-Processor 4 image processor pairing seen in the X-T3, for light sensitivity of ISO80-51,200 and up to 11 frames per second continuous shooting. There's hybrid autofocus, too, with the phase-detection AF benefiting from a new algorithm for improved speed and accuracy, even during very low-light photography.

And movie-makers are treated to Cinema 4K and 4K UDH available at up to 30 fps and Full HD at up to 120 fps. Bluetooth 4.2 and 802.11n Wi-Fi are included for remote operation and wireless data transfer.

The X-Pro3 will be available from late November, pricing starts at US$1,799.95. The video below has more.

Introducing the FUJIFILM X-Pro3

Product page: X-Pro3

3 comments
paul314
I wonder whether some of the return to the viewfinder is about the age of the separate-camera market. Even with bifocals I have to hold a regular LCD pretty far from my face to see what's going on.
Troublesh00ter
A viewfinder in a high-ambient-light environment is WAY easier to work with than attempting to use an LED screen whose image may be washed out by that same light. I grew up with the whole viewfinder school of thought, and I am pleased to see Fuji offering that old and useful tradition in its new products.
JeffK
I won't give cameras without an EVF a second look. Trying to frame a photo with a camera or phone at arms length is difficult for a static subject and ridiculous for any kind of fast action. A LCD panel is fine for tripod work such as a group photo or when tilted for shooting over a crowd or low level subjects, but a lot of my photos are telephoto shots of wildlife. While stabilization technology is wonderful it still has limits, so holding a camera to your eye provides an extra level of control. The quality of electronic viewfinders has also made huge advances in the last few years, typified by the ever increasing number of high end mirrorless cameras in the marketplace.