Automotive

Domino's cooks up the perfect pizza delivery vehicle

Domino's cooks up the perfect ...
The DXP can accommodate up to 80 pizzas
The DXP can accommodate up to 80 pizzas
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The DXP can accommodate up to 80 pizzas
1/5
The DXP can accommodate up to 80 pizzas
There is only space for a driver in the DXP, the passenger seat has been removed to make way for extra storage compartments
2/5
There is only space for a driver in the DXP, the passenger seat has been removed to make way for extra storage compartments
The DXP has a built-in oven at the rear that can be heated up to 140° F (60° C) to keep pizzas warm
3/5
The DXP has a built-in oven at the rear that can be heated up to 140° F (60° C) to keep pizzas warm
The DXP features a side-mounted light to illuminate sidewalks for the delivery driver
4/5
The DXP features a side-mounted light to illuminate sidewalks for the delivery driver
The DXP has front and rear storage areas with non-slip, easy-to-clean surfaces
5/5
The DXP has front and rear storage areas with non-slip, easy-to-clean surfaces

Lots of pizza parlours claim to make the best slice, but few could claim to deliver it as well as Domino's now can. The firm has unveiled a "first-of-its-kind, purpose-built pizza-delivery vehicle" called the Domino's Delivery Expert (DXP) that has a built-in oven to keep your stuffed crust piping hot.

Believe it or not, the DXP isn't just a marketing gimmick. The design and production of the DXP took over three years and included a crowdsourced design competition that launched in 2013 and was run by Local Motors. The Ultimate Delivery Vehicle Challenge received a total of 385 entries, with input from Domino's employees, customers and automotive designers from around the world.

The "design" stage generated ideas that would help delivery drivers to do their job as easily as possible and the "packaging" stage determined what vehicle the DXP would be based on. The following "interior" and "surfacing" stages focused on what features the DXP would have inside and how it would look outside. Finally, the "rendering" stage brought the design to life with the production of photorealistic renderings.

Following the completion of design competition, the concept was then taken forward to development, with the final vehicle based on a Chevrolet Spark. It was felt that the 1.2-liter engine and automatic transmission of the Spark would make it fun and easy to drive, while also delivering a favorable 39 mpg (7 l/100 km) on the highway. An OnStar navigation system is fitted to give drivers turn-by-turn directions.

The DXP has a built-in oven at the rear that can be heated up to 140° F (60° C) to keep pizzas warm
The DXP has a built-in oven at the rear that can be heated up to 140° F (60° C) to keep pizzas warm

The DXP has a built-in oven that can be heated up to 140° F (60° C) to keep pizzas warm and is designed for easy loading and unloading. It is accessible to drivers only via the touch of a key fob to ensure the precious cargo remains secure. The oven can hold two of Domino's Heatwave bags and the DXP can accommodate up to 80 pizzas in total.

The DXP has also been designed to provide plenty of storage space. There is only one seat, for the driver, with the passenger side given over to extra storage compartments. These are variously designed to stabilize pizzas and secure other items such as drinks and sauces. There are also front and rear storage areas with non-slip, easy-to-clean surfaces.

There is only space for a driver in the DXP, the passenger seat has been removed to make way for extra storage compartments
There is only space for a driver in the DXP, the passenger seat has been removed to make way for extra storage compartments

Elsewhere, the DXP features a side-mounted light to illuminate sidewalks, as well a light on top of the vehicle that is switched on to indicate that the vehicle is making a delivery. Every DXP can also be personalized to include such things as the name of its driver, its call sign and its home base.

Domino's is in the process of rolling out 100 DXPs across the US, including in Boston, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, San Diego and Seattle.

Sources: Domino's DXP, Local Motors

20 comments
KarlMueller
"Up to 140 degrees", huh? Funny, that's exactly the temperature at which potentially harmful bacteria START TO DIE. Perfect living conditions for them? 40 to 140. Ask any Chef. So, they built a box to grow bacteria...how nice. I hope they intend to sanitize those things DAILY. Even then, no thank you. I'll make my own.
fearnow
The Deliverator it isn't.
POOL PUMPREAPAIR guy longwood
These vehicles are intended for funeral operators in mind to help boost sales, bacteria/smearea, that what doesn't kill ya make you stronger. and has anyone Ever seen mold on a Domino's pizza ?
The 1 TaiN
1983 to 2002, Ford Escort. Hand's Down, You couldn't KILL THEM even if you TRIED. Ran better, even after a few car crashes.
gizmowiz
It has one serious flaw--it's not an EV. Ev's make far better delivery vehicles with no pollution. Domino's could easily mount solar on it's rooftops and charge all the cars via the sun. EV's have far quicker acceleration for making quick deliveries too.
rseifer
I think I'll wait for the stretched version because I never order less than 80 pizzas at a time. In fact, there's 125 stacked up here in the living room just now. Ralph L. Seifer, Long Beach, California Pardon me, that's wrong. I just went back and counted to be sure, and it's actually 132.
Bob Flint
I first thought they actually make them as they drive....hahaha Man talk about steaming up your windows with just my single pie....
David A Galler
the box although used mainly below 140 should have the capability of going to at 165.
Azar Attura
The oven is right above the gas tank.
John in Brisbane
I thought of the deliverator too lol. Btw that fuel consumption would be around town. A 1.2 engine on the highway would be getting 4's or 5's. Even the rough old chugger gm keeps putting in hatchbacks. My 2.5 Subaru gets 7.5 on the highway.