Bicycles

Cargo bike's front end comes off to become a stroller

The 2019 Dragonfly 2in1 will be at the Spezi specialty bike show in April
The 2019 Dragonfly 2in1 will be at the Spezi specialty bike show in April
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The Dragonfly 2in1 is constructed largely of carbon fiber and Kevlar, weighing in at 23 kg (51 lb) depending on configuration
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The Dragonfly 2in1 is constructed largely of carbon fiber and Kevlar, weighing in at 23 kg (51 lb) depending on configuration
The 2019 Dragonfly 2in1 will be at the Spezi specialty bike show in April
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The 2019 Dragonfly 2in1 will be at the Spezi specialty bike show in April
The Dragonfly 2in1's cabin gets detached via a quick-release mechanism within a claimed 15 seconds
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The Dragonfly 2in1's cabin gets detached via a quick-release mechanism within a claimed 15 seconds

While many people use cargo bikes to haul their small children from place to place, how do they cart their tykes around upon reaching their destination? Well, in the case of the Dragonfly 2in1, the kid-carrying cabin simply detaches from the rest of the bike, becoming a stroller.

Made by German company Libelle, the 2in1 has actually been around for a few years. At next month's Spezi specialty bike show, however, the new-and-improved 2019 model will make its debut.

The bicycle and its cabin are constructed largely of carbon fiber and Kevlar, the two units weighing in at a combined 23 kg (51 lb) depending on configuration. A maximum payload of 180 kg (397 lb) is possible.

Standard equipment includes a Shimano Alfine 8- or 11-speed rear hub transmission with a belt drive, a dynamo-powered Busch and Müller headlight, and a Magura front rim brake along with an Avid rear mechanical disc brake. To add some oomph to their pedalling power, buyers can also opt for a 250-watt Pendix bottom-bracket motor.

The Dragonfly 2in1's cabin gets detached via a quick-release mechanism within a claimed 15 seconds
The Dragonfly 2in1's cabin gets detached via a quick-release mechanism within a claimed 15 seconds

But yes, the 2in1's cabin/cargo compartment does come off. It gets detached via a quick-release mechanism within a claimed 15 seconds. Additionally, a set of small wheels are folded down from its underside, to support its rear end. The bike's handlebars, which stay attached to the unit, are used to push it around.

According to Libelle, the cabin is capable of safely carrying two children who are no more than seven years old. They're protected from the elements by clear roll-back side panels, and can be secured in their seats via optional five-point harnesses.

Should you be interested, pricing for the Dragonfly 2in1 starts at €3,340 (about US$3,760). And for a different take on a cargo bike/baby-buggy combo, check out the Salamander Bicycle Stroller.

Source: Libelle

1 comment
Michael Crumpton
I was surprised that something this elaborate was not more expensive. One thing that would make it even better would be a front wheel/handlebar accessory so you could use the rear part as a bike separately from the stroller part.