Bicycles

Baby-carrying bicycle transforms into a stroller in seconds

The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
View 15 Images
The seats are padded with belts should the ride get a little bumpy
1/15
The seats are padded with belts should the ride get a little bumpy
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
2/15
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
3/15
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
The seats are padded with belts should the ride get a little bumpy
4/15
The seats are padded with belts should the ride get a little bumpy
The idea is that the rider can glide around town with the little ones up front, and then when the time comes to enter a store, subway station or restaurant, they can hop off and switch to stroller mode in a matter of seconds
5/15
The idea is that the rider can glide around town with the little ones up front, and then when the time comes to enter a store, subway station or restaurant, they can hop off and switch to stroller mode in a matter of seconds
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
6/15
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
The Salamander looks to combine the advantages of a bicycle and stroller to make for a highly practical, multipurpose people carrier
7/15
The Salamander looks to combine the advantages of a bicycle and stroller to make for a highly practical, multipurpose people carrier
The Salamander looks to combine the advantages of a bicycle and stroller to make for a highly practical, multipurpose people carrier
8/15
The Salamander looks to combine the advantages of a bicycle and stroller to make for a highly practical, multipurpose people carrier
Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front
9/15
Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front
Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front
10/15
Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front
With Shimano Nexus gears, 20-inch alloy wheels and a steel frame, the makers have settled on their final design after around five years of tinkering
11/15
With Shimano Nexus gears, 20-inch alloy wheels and a steel frame, the makers have settled on their final design after around five years of tinkering
Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front
12/15
Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
13/15
The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg)
With Shimano Nexus gears, 20-inch alloy wheels and a steel frame, the makers have settled on their final design after around five years of tinkering
14/15
With Shimano Nexus gears, 20-inch alloy wheels and a steel frame, the makers have settled on their final design after around five years of tinkering
The idea is that the rider can glide around town with the little ones up front, and then when the time comes to enter a store, subway station or restaurant, they can hop off and switch to stroller mode in a matter of seconds
15/15
The idea is that the rider can glide around town with the little ones up front, and then when the time comes to enter a store, subway station or restaurant, they can hop off and switch to stroller mode in a matter of seconds

If a skateboard that doubles as a stroller is a little too extreme for your parenting modus operandi, then perhaps a trusty old bicycle might be more to your liking. The Salamander Bicycle Stroller aims to keep parents on the move by providing a two-wheeled way of getting around town and quickly converting into a stroller when they reach their destination.

Much like the Taga we covered way back in 2008, the Salamander looks to combine the advantages of a bicycle and stroller to make for a highly practical, multipurpose people carrier. It is a 7-speed folding cargo bike with a large enough compartment at the front to seat two children and a retractable bug and rain screen for shelter.

The idea is that the rider can glide around town with the little ones up front, and then when the time comes to enter a store, subway station or restaurant, they can hop off and switch to stroller mode in a matter of seconds.

Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front
Just like other folding bikes that use an "N-folding" mechanism, the Salamander's rear end can be pulled up and in alongside the front

The N-folding mechanism allows the Salamander's rear end to be pulled up and in alongside the front, then the separate wheel that sits on the outside of the seating compartment is lowered to the ground and voilà, you've got yourself a sturdy three-wheeled baby cart. The Salamander can accommodate children up to 46 in (116 cm) tall and 79 lb (36 kg), and the seats are padded with belts should the ride get a little bumpy.

With Shimano Nexus gears, 20-inch alloy wheels and a steel frame, the makers have settled on their final design after around five years of tinkering. They are now running a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for commercial production, which apparently isn't coming cheap. Early pledges of CAD$6,000 (US$4,393) will have a Salamander heading your way in July if the campaign runs as planned.

You can check out the pitch video below.

Source: Wike Bicycle

Amphibian Bike Series: The "Salamander" Bicycle Stroller

4 comments
Rehab
Looks to be really well designed. The price seems right for what you're getting. Just shy of 80 lbs. would be nice to see it come with e-drive.
Stephen N Russell
mass produce & lower Unit costs, for all families to be./
ljaques
At 79 pounds, mothers won't be tossing those into the trunk to take to the beach to cruise or going up many hills with one. The price is fantastic! (Did I just severely misspell "outFREAKIN'rageous"? Still 79 pounds after 5 years of redesign? Ouch. Perhaps a fiberglass hull (amphib, right?) would have been lighter. And aluminum tubing (even titanium at that price point) would have helped. NICE cockpit design. Kudos. The picture of the welding of the frame on the website scared me. It appeared holey, much like my first practice tube welding. =:0 Kind of a cute idea, but it's way too heavy and overpriced to even make its Kickstarter budget, even if it were extended by several months. Good luck, folks.
Timelord
I would have built it as a trike to begin with for better stability with that much weight, especially when stopped. No need to put a foot down. Eliminate the seat tube and mount the saddle on an arch instead. The entire rear end would just slide forward until the rear wheels straddled the child carrier.