Drones

XAG V40 agri-drone uses just two rotors for better performance

XAG V40 agri-drone uses just t...
The V40 agricultural drone has just two rotors, but it compensates by being able to tilt them to the front and back
The V40 agricultural drone has just two rotors, but it compensates by being able to tilt them to the front and back
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The V40 has a carbon-reinforced polymer body, which is IP67 water-resistant
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The V40 has a carbon-reinforced polymer body, which is IP67 water-resistant
The V40 has a spray rate of 10 liters (2.6 gal) per minute, and can dispense seeds at a rate of 40 kg (88 lb) per minute
2/3
The V40 has a spray rate of 10 liters (2.6 gal) per minute, and can dispense seeds at a rate of 40 kg (88 lb) per minute
The V40 agricultural drone has just two rotors, but it compensates by being able to tilt them to the front and back
3/3
The V40 agricultural drone has just two rotors, but it compensates by being able to tilt them to the front and back
View gallery - 3 images

Usually when we think of multicopter drones, we picture aircraft with four or more rotors. The V40 agricultural drone takes a different approach, using two tilting two rotors in an effort to improve range and spraying efficiency.

Manufactured by Chinese company XAG, the modular V40 comes with a 16-liter (4.2-gal) liquid tank for herbicide/pesticide, a 25-liter (6.6-gal) granular container for seeds, and it has two folding arms – each of those arms has one rotor (a set of two rotor blades) on top, and a spray nozzle on the bottom.

Regular multicopter drones are able to move forwards, backwards, left and right by varying the distribution of thrust between their four or more fixed-angle rotors. The V40 only has the two rotors, but it gets around that limitation by being able to electronically tilt them fore and aft relative to the arms.

The V40 has a carbon-reinforced polymer body, which is IP67 water-resistant
The V40 has a carbon-reinforced polymer body, which is IP67 water-resistant

According to XAG, this system is much more energy-efficient than traditional multicopter setups. Although the company hasn't provided any figures on battery range, a similar "bicopter" manufactured by Zero Zero Robotics is claimed to be able to fly for 50 minutes per charge. By contrast, most quadcopter drones top out at about 30 minutes.

Additionally, XAG claims that because the two nozzles are located directly below the two rotors, the resulting downdraft distributes the sprayed liquid in a more focused, concentrated pattern than would otherwise be possible. This means that less of the chemicals are wasted, as they aren't randomly blown all over the place.

The V40 has a spray rate of 10 liters (2.6 gal) per minute, and can dispense seeds at a rate of 40 kg (88 lb) per minute
The V40 has a spray rate of 10 liters (2.6 gal) per minute, and can dispense seeds at a rate of 40 kg (88 lb) per minute

Utilizing onboard GPS and a downward-facing terrain radar module, the V40 begins by flying over a field, mapping out its boundaries and geographical features. It subsequently uses that data to autonomously perform spraying or seeding runs, utilizing an additional forward-facing radar system to avoid any obstacles that might pop up. Users can also take manual control via a radio remote, if desired.

Potential buyers should contact XAG for a quote. The V40 can be seen in action, on YouTube.

Source: XAG

View gallery - 3 images
5 comments
5 comments
Aermaco
Tilt rotors have the potential to be the most fuel-efficient in range, speed, and utility by using the maximum thrust axis to travel axis continuity.
Rustgecko
Four rotors, one fails the drone continues flying. Two rotors, one fails, it crashes.
Aermaco
There is no crash required if the remaining prop thrust axis matches the wing chord axis enough so it can maintain lift like any twin engine aircraft.
Ralf Biernacki
@Aermaco: "so IT can maintain lift"---what is the IT in this sentence? Please clarify. There is no wing chord axis, for the excellent reason that there is no wing.
bwana4swahili
Wow, pretty soon they'll have a 'multicopter' with only rotor! How amazing that will be!