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WaterDrop puts water savings in the bag

WaterDrop puts water savings i...
The WaterDrop takes the form of a tote bag that allows for the easy collection, storage and transportation of water
The WaterDrop takes the form of a tote bag that allows for the easy collection, storage and transportation of water
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The WaterDrop takes the form of a tote bag that allows for the easy collection, storage and transportation of water
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The WaterDrop takes the form of a tote bag that allows for the easy collection, storage and transportation of water
The WaterDrop is made of recyclable thermoplastic polyurethane
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The WaterDrop is made of recyclable thermoplastic polyurethane
The WaterDrop has a reinforced handle for carrying around
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The WaterDrop has a reinforced handle for carrying around
The WaterDrop is designed, in part, to raise awareness of the need for saving water
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The WaterDrop is designed, in part, to raise awareness of the need for saving water
A diagram of the WaterDrop's design
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A diagram of the WaterDrop's design

Recently, showers like the Nebia and the Hamwell's e-Shower have launched to help us save water when showering. The WaterDrop foldable watering can, however, takes a much simpler approach. It is designed to collect the average 3.5 l (0.8 gal) of water we waste waiting for the shower to warm up.

Designed by Spanish startup Esferic, saving water is only part of the WaterDrop's aim. It is also hoped that it will help to "promote a societal shift in water consumption habits" by increasing people's awareness about the need to be frugal with water.

Nonetheless, Esferic says daily use of the Waterdrop will save users more than 1,000 l (220 gal) of water a year. It is made of recyclable thermoplastic polyurethane and takes the form of a tote bag with a reinforced handle so as to allow for the easy collection, storage and transportation of water.

To use the WaterDrop, users simply need to hold it under a shower head until the water runs warm. They can then continue with their shower, while the water collected can then be used for other domestic purposes, such as filling a mop bucket, watering plants or even flushing the toilet.

A diagram of the WaterDrop's design
A diagram of the WaterDrop's design

Esferic says it plans to develop a mobile app to accompany the WaterDrop so that users can measure the water savings they are making. A Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign for the WaterDrop was successfully completed today. If all goes to plan, shipping to backers is estimated to start in March.

The video below provides an introduction to the WaterDrop.

Source: Esferic

#Waterdrop (#BolsaDelAgua): Creating a worldwide network of water savers

10 comments
S Michael
Finally someone came up with a simple, good idea. Now manufacture it, but don't charge a lot of money for it. Sell it to the masses, save a lot of water.
Timelord
€12 for a plastic bag that's hard to clean and will get punctured sooner or later, with no way to repair it. Okay. I've been saving water from my shower with a simple, easy to handle, rigid bucket for years. (Uninsulated pipes mean I have to wait over 30 seconds for hot water, a lot more than 3 liters.) I then use it to flush the toilet, which 3l would basically be useless for. If I wanted to water plants, transferring the water to a watering can works fine, especially for hanging plants. Good luck trying to water a high pot with this wobbly, flexible thing. Overly complicated solution to a simple problem.
James Smith
Amazingly useless. They will sell thousands of them. Here in Brazil, we have a simpler solution. Small electric heaters in the shower head. It's cheaper and better to heat a small amount of water when you need it rather than 100 liters all the time. Central water heaters are almost unknown here.
KevinFowler
Much better to install a water recirculating system.
michael_dowling
S Michael Beat me to the punch.A simple wash bucket would beat the pants off this goofy idea.As as Timelord commented,they will find plenty of stupid yuppies to buy these gadgets.
Paul Anthony
Yes a simple bucket will do instead, and once this is available mass produce, all for pennies, and include them with the water bill. We'll find all sorts of other uses for them.
Brian M
Better solution is just to have a cold shower! Save on water (you wont stay in as long) You wake up faster The yelling alerts others that you are in the bathroom
milliard
I had a water diverter and hose, running into a watering can, attached to the shower head fitting. When the water heats swithch the diverter to the shower head. Works even better with a colour changing LED shower head as you can see when the water is hot.
MD
Who lets the "first flush" cold water go down the drain in a bath? Don't you need at least some cold water to make the bathwater just-the-right temp? Much better would be catching and reusing (with grey water treatment, whatever that means) all of the water used in the bath or shower, it is basically still fresh water after the shower/bath (with a little soap and bodily fluids). Plenty good enough for watering the cactus or flower bed with, use it to keep your reed-filtration-trench thriving, encourage growth in an evaporative-hydration greenhouse. Endless possibilities. What wasteful societies we have created. And we all need an app for that, what a load of crap.
CarolynR
Great idea to make a bit of money for the manufacturers, from people who want to feel good about apparently being 'green'. Will it save any significant amount of water? No. It will puncture on thorns in the garden, become wet and messy, be left away from the bathroom, become a nuisance and finally be lost after three or four uses. Much better to focus on reducing the volume of water entering and leaving the shower head.