Architecture

Futuro House was a tiny house before tiny houses were a thing

Futuro House was a tiny house ...
The Futuro House was designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen
The Futuro House was designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen
View 11 Images
The Futuro House was designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen
1/11
The Futuro House was designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen
The first Futuro House prototype was built in early 1968
2/11
The first Futuro House prototype was built in early 1968
Restoration of Futuro House No. 022 began in January 2014
3/11
Restoration of Futuro House No. 022 began in January 2014
It is thought that only around 60 Futuro Houses still exist
4/11
It is thought that only around 60 Futuro Houses still exist
Futuro House No. 022 has been restored by Craig Barnes
5/11
Futuro House No. 022 has been restored by Craig Barnes
The Futuro House took an elliptical form and was made of 16 fiberglass segments that would bolt together
6/11
The Futuro House took an elliptical form and was made of 16 fiberglass segments that would bolt together
The Futuro House is said to have been intended for use as a prefabricated ski cabin
7/11
The Futuro House is said to have been intended for use as a prefabricated ski cabin
Futuro House 022 was discovered in South Africa and was saved from being destroyed
8/11
Futuro House 022 was discovered in South Africa and was saved from being destroyed
Futuro House No. 022 has been designed for hosting events and activities
9/11
Futuro House No. 022 has been designed for hosting events and activities
Fewer than 100 Futuro Houses were ever made
10/11
Fewer than 100 Futuro Houses were ever made
Futuro House No. 022 is on display at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London
11/11
Futuro House No. 022 is on display at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London
View gallery - 11 images

Interest in tiny houses has exploded in recent years, but the idea isn't new as this tiny home from the 1960s shows. Fewer than 100 Futuro Houses were ever made, but they have become something of a design icon. Now, one is on display at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (CSM) in London.

The Futuro House was designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen and was intended for use as a prefabricated ski cabin that would be "quick to heat and easy to construct in rough terrain." It took an elliptical form and was made of 16 fiberglass segments that would be bolted together.

The first prototype was built in early 1968 and they began being manufactured around the world. However, unusual design was often not well received and, to compound matters, the oil crisis of the early 1970s caused plastic prices to treble. These factors contributed to the demise of the Futuro House.

Futuro House 022 was discovered in South Africa and was saved from being destroyed
Futuro House 022 was discovered in South Africa and was saved from being destroyed

It is thought that only around 60 Futuro Houses are still in existence, one of which was acquired by artist Craig Barnes in 2013. Barnes discovered Futuro House No. 022 in South Africa and saved it from being destroyed. He had it dismantled and transported 12,000 miles (19,312 km) to Herefordshire, UK over a period of 18 months, after which restoration work began in January 2014.

With the restoration complete, Barnes is touring his Futuro House and is keen for it to be used as a place for activities, rather than just viewed as a museum piece. It is currently in situ on the terrace of CSM, where it is hosting a year-long series of events.

Source: Craig Barnes

View gallery - 11 images
9 comments
grant_else@hotmail.com
Just FYI... The future house design was very much reused for some fiberglass huts used for research in Antarctica by the Australian Antarctic Division in the 90s... They were locally called "Googie" huts and you can see them easily by googling "googie AAD" cheers
Grant
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that is really cool. I hope someone makes them again or something that is an updated version of it.
I would not mind living in such a house. I like different and this is very different.
I can see it being used in areas that have really high tides and / or flooding. The usual houses in these areas are on stilts. This one is on stilts by design.
JayP
I can still remember the Futuro we had here in Adelaide, South Australia, installed by a great local businessman and entrepreneur, Derek Jolly. It still exists and has been moved to a beautiful location at Deep Creek on the Fleurieu Peninsula. More info here; http://www.adelaiderememberwhen.com.au/the-space-ship-building-in-melbourne-street/
EddieG
Is this not the Dymaxion House?
pwndecaf
I like it!
SamAgazim
A subdivision 80 of these, or nearly identical, designed homes were built in a coastal town north of Taipei, Taiwan. The flats, known as Sanzhi Pod City, were built in New Taipei City and designed to be part of a holiday resort.During their construction and the immediate following years, there were numerous reports of paranormal activity in the community, and four unexplained deaths due to accidents. The entire subdivision sat empty from 1982 till they were all torn down for an amusement water park in 2008.
jeffrey
Is it a house or just a living room? does it have a bathroom and a kitchen? is there more than just one room? is there a bed room? how about closets and other storage space....
Douglas Bennett Rogers
This design has low air drag and is resistant to over pressure. It is also acceleration resistant and looks like it could float. Won't rust or rot and won't sun rot if painted. Best for built in furniture. Not expandable. Good for earth bermed if strong enough. This method is common for tornado shelters. These should be mass produced in North Dakota as a means of leveraging oil revenues.
Gavin Roe
they don't stack too well I suspect so not practical for over population