Architecture

Copper huts proposed for Canadian golf resort will "disappear" over time

Copper huts proposed for Canad...
Canadian architectural studio MU has proposed the construction of approximately 50 triangular luxury huts as part of the Bigwin Island development in Ontario, Canada
Canadian architectural studio MU has proposed the construction of approximately 50 triangular luxury huts as part of the Bigwin Island development in Ontario, Canada
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Canadian architectural studio MU has proposed the construction of approximately 50 triangular luxury huts as part of the Bigwin Island development in Ontario, Canada
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Canadian architectural studio MU has proposed the construction of approximately 50 triangular luxury huts as part of the Bigwin Island development in Ontario, Canada
The “Giants of Bigwin” project features a collection of private and quality retreats measuring between 1200 and 1500 square feet (111 and 140 sqm)
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The “Giants of Bigwin” project features a collection of private and quality retreats measuring between 1200 and 1500 square feet (111 and 140 sqm)
Dedicated to guests of the esteemed Bigwin Golf Club, the accommodation offers five star luxury in an innovative use of space
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Dedicated to guests of the esteemed Bigwin Golf Club, the accommodation offers five star luxury in an innovative use of space
The triangular floor plan allows for a multitude of views and layouts
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The triangular floor plan allows for a multitude of views and layouts
The unit features two bedrooms, two bathrooms, designer kitchen, open plan living and dining area complete with open fireplace.
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The unit features two bedrooms, two bathrooms, designer kitchen, open plan living and dining area complete with open fireplace.
Open plan living area is connected by a central spiral staircase
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Open plan living area is connected by a central spiral staircase
The facade is clad with copper strips which will oxidize over time and gradually turn green
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The facade is clad with copper strips which will oxidize over time and gradually turn green
The huts are built with steel anchors, wooden composite materials and a series of glass panels and insulated panels
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The huts are built with steel anchors, wooden composite materials and a series of glass panels and insulated panels
The individual units will be entirely prefabricated off-site and installed on-site, as to avoid impact on the natural landscape
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The individual units will be entirely prefabricated off-site and installed on-site, as to avoid impact on the natural landscape
Inspired by the Native American peoples of the land, the unique design of the cabins resemble Amerindian teepees
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Inspired by the Native American peoples of the land, the unique design of the cabins resemble Amerindian teepees
The interior design stretches over three levels and includes open space living combined with private outlooks onto the natural scenery
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The interior design stretches over three levels and includes open space living combined with private outlooks onto the natural scenery
“Giants of Bigwin” floor plan by MU Architecture
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“Giants of Bigwin” floor plan by MU Architecture
Alternate floor plan by MU Architecture
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Alternate floor plan by MU Architecture
“Giants of Bigwin” side view by MU Architecture
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“Giants of Bigwin” side view by MU Architecture
“Giants of Bigwin” by MU Architecture
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“Giants of Bigwin” by MU Architecture
“Giants of Bigwin” master plan by MU Architecture
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“Giants of Bigwin” master plan by MU Architecture
View gallery - 16 images

Canadian architectural studio MU has proposed the construction of approximately 50 triangular luxury huts as part of the Bigwin Island development in Lake of Bays, Ontario, Canada. The "Giants of Bigwin" competition entry features a collection of private retreats dedicated to guests of the esteemed Bigwin Golf Club. Measuring between 1,200 and 1,500 square feet (111 and 140 sqm), the huts are designed to eventually blend into their leafy surrounds.

Inspired by the Native American peoples of the land, the unique design of the cabins resembles Amerindian teepees and features a wooden triangular structure, which rests on pillars and is slightly raised above the ground. Built with steel anchors, wooden composite materials and a series of glass and insulated panels, the facade is clad with copper strips, which will oxidize over time and gradually turn green. This is intended to have a disappearing effect on the units as they eventually blur into the surrounding landscape.

The interior design stretches over three levels and includes open space living combined with private outlooks onto the natural scenery. Connected by a central spiral staircase, the units feature two bedrooms, two bathrooms, designer kitchen, open plan living and dining area complete with open fireplace.

The interior design stretches over three levels and includes open space living combined with private outlooks onto the natural scenery
The interior design stretches over three levels and includes open space living combined with private outlooks onto the natural scenery

"The design proposal with its various volumes of different sizes and functions can be combined in a multitude of ways, [adapting] to the needs of the client and allows a high degree of personalization," say the designers. "For example, it is possible to attach a terrace, a garage for two golf carts or an additional bedroom. Smaller base units consisting of only one bedroom are [also] ideal for renting out."

The individual units are designed to be entirely prefabricated off-site and installed on-site, so as to avoid impact on the natural landscape.

Source: MU Architecture via Archello

[UPDATE Feb. 25/15: The winning entry in the competition ended up coming from MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects, not MU]

View gallery - 16 images
4 comments
martinkopplow
So they want the toxic copper oxides that form on the surface get washed down the roof and into the soil, don't they? That is quite a different understanding of 'blending into the landsape'. I believe it is a bad idea to use copper, the 'diapperaing' effect could be created by other means.
Bob Flint
Yes, it would definitely disappear, even before the oxidation, as thieves will make of with the metals. We even had the ventilation covers stolen right off the roof of the school across from our home.
BabA
Agree with Martin. Copper is a standard ingredient in many anti-fungal garden sprays. I am not sure what the long-term effects would be on the local flora and fauna, but they are unlikely to be good.
It would also irritate me to have to look between the slats to see outside.
Danny Allman
@martinkopplow: Sorry to tell you, but you're just plain wrong. Copper and copper oxides are only toxic if you ingest them directly and in quantity. Copper is in fact a trace element that your body absolutely requires. In this case, however, the copper oxides form on the copper surface of the building in question, and form a green patina that does NOT wash off, ever. The patina is bonded to the elemental copper below it, and will last hundreds of years, or even longer in dry conditions. In wet conditions it eventually corrodes, but only after a very long time (several human lifetimes, most likely). It never—ever—reaches the soil, and is completely harmless.
@BabA: copper compounds are sometimes used in anti-fungal garden sprays for good reason: copper and its oxides are anti-viral, anti-bacterial and, to a lesser extent, anti-fungal. Don't assume that anything in a garden spray is toxic, just because that seems logical. Yes, many things sold to be sprayed onto plants are toxic. Copper is not one of them!