Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson rolls out its next-generation XG750R flat tracker

Harley-Davidson rolls out its ...
The new Harley-Davidson XG750R has been carefully designed to reflect the iconic XR750, which it is intended to replace
The new Harley-Davidson XG750R has been carefully designed to reflect the iconic XR750, which it is intended to replace
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Davis Fisher while testing the new Harley-Davidson XG750R
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Davis Fisher while testing the new Harley-Davidson XG750R
Davis Fisher while testing the new Harley-Davidson XG750R
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Davis Fisher while testing the new Harley-Davidson XG750R
The Revolution X engine of the Street 750 had been tuned by Vance & Hines Motorsport in order to power the new Harley-Davidson XG750R
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The Revolution X engine of the Street 750 had been tuned by Vance & Hines Motorsport in order to power the new Harley-Davidson XG750R
The first official race of the Harley-Davidson XG750R will be at the Springfield Mile on May 29
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The first official race of the Harley-Davidson XG750R will be at the Springfield Mile on May 29
Sporting a completely different frame geometry than the production model, the Harley-Davidson XG750R is a race-only flat tracker
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Sporting a completely different frame geometry than the production model, the Harley-Davidson XG750R is a race-only flat tracker
Black on the left side and orange on the right, the XG750R will gradually replace the XR750 in Harley-Davidson's factory team
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Black on the left side and orange on the right, the XG750R will gradually replace the XR750 in Harley-Davidson's factory team
The fuel tank of the Harley-Davidson XG750R is a new design that holds just enough gas to last the race distance
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The fuel tank of the Harley-Davidson XG750R is a new design that holds just enough gas to last the race distance
The new Harley-Davidson XG750R has been carefully designed to reflect the iconic XR750, which it is intended to replace
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The new Harley-Davidson XG750R has been carefully designed to reflect the iconic XR750, which it is intended to replace

After 44 years of racing success with the iconic XR750, Harley-Davidson in entering a new era with the introduction of its new flat tracker. The XG750R is a racing-only machine developed around the Revolution X liquid-cooled V-twin engine that powers the Street 750 production model.

Harley-Davidson's XR750 is undoubtedly one of the most successful motorcycles of the recent history of American Flat Track racing. Initially introduced in 1970 as a modified Sportster, it evolved into an all-conquering flat tracker after an extensive redesign in 1972 and then proceeded to dominate the AMA Pro Flat Track Grand National Championship (GNC) for the best part of the last four decades.

The arrival of the new Street model series in 500 and 750 cc brought about a new V-twin engine. The liquid-cooled V-twin Revolution X in its larger displacement version perfectly fit the flat track racer bill, as Harley-Davidson built around it the XG750R flat tracker.

The task of converting this road-legal unit into a top-level flat track racer was undertaken by Vance & Hines Motorsports, resulting in the XG750R that will make its racing debut at the Springfield Mile in Illinois, USA, on May 29.

Sporting a completely different frame geometry than the production model, the Harley-Davidson XG750R is a race-only flat tracker
Sporting a completely different frame geometry than the production model, the Harley-Davidson XG750R is a race-only flat tracker

Technical details of the new motorcycle have not been disclosed, although we should expect a host of updates to the engine. Taking advantage of the extensive tuning leeway allowed by the AMA's rules, the performance of the XG750R will probably climb considerably higher than the 53 hp (40 kW) of the production model, while keeping the bike's weight down to the 300 lb (136 kg) minimum limit set for the GNC1 class. Obviously, the new racer shares very few, if any, parts in common with the Street 750.

The Harley-Davidson Screamin' Eagle Factory Team will start by fielding one XG750R for its rider Davis Fisher. The 18 year-old GNC1 rookie, and last year's GNC2 champion, will carry out important development work on the new motorcycle while racing it. The team's main rider and 2013 national champion, Brad Baker, will continue racing the XR750 for now.

"The XG750R has shown great potential in testing and the first few races this season," says Kris Schoonover, Harley-Davidson racing manager. "But as with any new racing motorcycle, there will be work to do. We're excited to continue testing the XG750R in real world competition, and as we make our way through the season, we will evaluate the performance of the bike and our factory riders to see if Baker might switch to the new bike."

For the time being there are no immediate plans to introduce a road-legal version of the XG750R.

Source: Harley-Davidson

4 comments
Imran Sheikh
Wow, what is this thing, So Ugly. and that silencer will roast the leg along with reducing efficiency. hope the cover the exposed front side of chain at least.
chidrbmt
I.S.,obvious you know little about flat track racing. Ugly? There was nothing more beautiful sounding and race exciting than a full mile track of XR750's flying by withing inches of each other at 120 mph. Makes NASCAR a complete snoozefest. Sad few "motorcyclists" ever see such a sight.
VincentBrennan
Okay so now I am going to feel old as I remember going to Ascot Park in Gardena, CA. the first year the XR 750 replaced the old KR and watch the Yamahas kid their butts....for a little while when they still had the amazing Kenny Roberts riding them. Kenny left for European road racing and this amazing Michigan kid (back then almost all the fast guys came from either CA or Michigan) named Jay Springsteen became one of two factory Harley riders tuned by the equally amazing Bill Werner. Before long Ascot was the ONLY place the Yamahas and the stunning Ron Woods Norton with Alex Jorgenson aboard could beat that damn XR!! Woods/Jorgenson were track champs at Ascot but when we went to the San Jose Mile twice a year you HAD to have an XR and that was true all over the country..... I have never been a Harley fan on the street and definitely not the race track but you have to give them their due! Except a short time when Honda challenged them with Ricky Graham and Bubba Shobert and actually beat them the entire 45 years since if you wanted the AMA #1 plate you had to be riding an XR. In the last few years the AMA opened up the rules to allow more converted street bikes to be competitive with the XR and now the old bike ios starting to seem just that....old. The same Bill Werner that tuned the XR for Springsteen so long ago saw something in the Kawasaki 650 twin and when he worked his magic suddenly the XR has been playing catch up on the mile tracks while still winning most half miles (which is most of the schedule) but the writing was on the wall. The XR's days were growing older just like those of us that watched it become THE MOST DOMINATE motorcycle in AMA history it's days were numbered. H-D had to do something. Make no mistake the new XG750R is not going to take over right away but it's young rookie Davis Fisher just made the Main at Springfield Mile this weekend @ the bikes official unveiling even if he had to ride the Semi to get there. The XG WILL replace the old XR .....it is the nature of things. The guys I watched win the first races on the XR are grandfathers now. The XG is the future of H-D Dirt Track racing. I think it is better looking. It is liquid cooled. Over head cams. It is a modern bike Nothing lasts forever, even the incredible XR750 after almost half a century, will soon be the also ran. I am sure it will have a few more years in it, Might even be a few around for it's 50th year in 2021 but there probably won't be many. Mr. Imran Sheikh I am going to be kind because you do not know American dirt track racing. Do yourself a huge favor and Google "2016 Springfield Mile" and you will get link to see these bikes going 130 mph in huge drafting packs on a one mile dirt oval. To give you an idea I once counted 37 lead changes in a 10 lap heat race at San Jose. Some of the best racing anywhere in the world.
chidrbmt
Well written,short history of dirt track racing,Vincent. Having seen & followed all the AMA pro dirt tracks over the decades,none will ever equal the wild,crazy ride of K.R. winning Indy on a "dirt" Yamaha 2 stroke TZ750. His first comment after the race was "they don't pay me enough to ride one of these." So fellow bikers, do yourself a huge favor and go see a mile dirt track race live. You'll be hooked forever. The Peoria TT race (by a local,well respected motorcycle club) is also right up there in excitement and close racing too.