Home Entertainment

Anker lights up home movie night with Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector

Anker lights up home movie nig...
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector can throw visuals at up to 150 diagonal inches and puts out 2,400 lumens
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector can throw visuals at up to 150 diagonal inches and puts out 2,400 lumens
View 3 Images
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector can throw visuals at up to 150 diagonal inches and puts out 2,400 lumens
1/3
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector can throw visuals at up to 150 diagonal inches and puts out 2,400 lumens
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector tips the scales at 10.7 lb and sports a sturdy carry handle for portability
2/3
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector tips the scales at 10.7 lb and sports a sturdy carry handle for portability
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector doesn't have its own battery so will need to be placed near a wall outlet, or connected to a portable power station like the Anker 545 shown
3/3
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector doesn't have its own battery so will need to be placed near a wall outlet, or connected to a portable power station like the Anker 545 shown
View gallery - 3 images

Anker Innovations has returned to Kickstarter with a new addition to its Nebula line of DLP projectors. As its name suggests, the Cosmos Laser 4K brings a laser light source to the watch party for up to 150 diagonal inches of on-wall viewing at 2,400 lumens.

Though the integrated carry handle might have you thinking that Anker's new 4K laser long-throw projector has been designed for movies on the go, it doesn't have an internal battery so users will still need to find a wall outlet or a portable power station like Anker's own 545 model (not included) before movie night can begin.

Movie lovers can enjoy 4K UHD (3,840 x 2,160) content at sizes that would make many living room TVs feel small, throwing up to 150-inch visuals from 13.85 ft away from the wall or screen, going down to 60 diagonal inches from 5.54 ft away. And if you're using a screen, the unit will auto align for setup ease. Autofocus and auto keystone correction should also help with positioning flexibility.

There's support for 100 percent of the Rec.709 color gamut, and HDR10 too, and the Laser Forge Image Engine includes ALPD 3.0 software to oversee brightness, saturation and contrast for cinema-like viewing, while the laser phosphor light source puts out 2,400 lumens for daytime-friendly watching and is reported good for up to 25,000 hours.

The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector tips the scales at 10.7 lb and sports a sturdy carry handle for portability
The Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K projector tips the scales at 10.7 lb and sports a sturdy carry handle for portability

The unit features ARM Cortex-A55 processing brains and Mali graphics supported by 2 GB of RAM and 16 GB of storage, and includes Bluetooth 5.0 and dual-band Wi-Fi connectivity. It runs Android TV 10 for access to thousands of entertainment apps, including Disney Plus, HBO, Amazon Prime, Hulu and Netflix, and there's support for Chromecasting as well.

Cable connections include USB and HDMI, and though there is an audio output jack the projector rocks two 10-W full-range speakers and two 5-W tweeters for powerful Dolby and AiFi immersive audio.

Announced last week at CES 2022 but hitting Kickstarter today, pledges for the Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K start at US$1,299, but there is a less capable HD version for under a grand. The campaign is already funded, and if everything else goes to plan shipping is estimated to start in March. The video below has more.

Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K: The Most Compact 4K Laser Theater

Source: Anker

View gallery - 3 images
1 comment
1 comment
EH
"Phosphor laser"? sounds interesting, but I've never heard of that, let alone how it works. Might be worthy of an article. I've also never been clear on how typically 1920 x 1080 native resolution for the digital micro-mirror device gets enhanced to 4k. Vibration? Marketing? Also, why does only Texas Instruments make the DMD/DLP chips and drivers? Mostly quite expensive, too, especially the ones with high frame-rates. (Which have lots of other applications besides displays, such as spectroscopy and 3D printing.) Seems like the patents should have run out several years ago.